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I have a computation inside ST which allocates memory through a Data.Vector.Unboxed.Mutable. The vector is never read or written, nor is any reference retained to it outside of runST (to the best of my knowledge). The problem I have is that when I run my ST computation multiple times, I sometimes seem to keep the memory for the vector around.

Allocation statistics:

5,435,386,768 bytes allocated in the heap
    5,313,968 bytes copied during GC
  134,364,780 bytes maximum residency (14 sample(s))
    3,160,340 bytes maximum slop
          518 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)

Here I call runST 20x with different values for my computation and a 128MB vector (again - unused, not returned or referenced outside of ST). The maximum residency looks good, basically just my vector plus a few MB of other stuff. But the total memory use indicates that I have four copies of the vector active at the same time. This scales perfectly with the size of the vector, for 256MB we get 1030MB as expected.

Using a 1GB vector runs out of memory (4x1GB + overhead > 32bit). I don't understand why the RTS keeps seemingly unused, unreferenced memory around instead of just GC'ing it, at least at the point where an allocation would otherwise fail.

Running with +RTS -S reveals the following:

    Alloc    Copied     Live    GC    GC     TOT     TOT  Page Flts
    bytes     bytes     bytes  user  elap    user    elap
134940616     13056 134353540  0.00  0.00    0.09    0.19    0    0  (Gen:  1)
   583416      6756 134347504  0.00  0.00    0.09    0.19    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   518020     17396 134349640  0.00  0.00    0.09    0.19    0    0  (Gen:  1)
   521104     13032 134359988  0.00  0.00    0.09    0.19    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520972      1344 134360752  0.00  0.00    0.09    0.19    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   521100       828 134360684  0.00  0.00    0.10    0.19    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520812       592 134360528  0.00  0.00    0.10    0.19    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520936      1344 134361324  0.00  0.00    0.10    0.19    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520788      1480 134361476  0.00  0.00    0.10    0.20    0    0  (Gen:  0)
134438548      5964 268673908  0.00  0.00    0.19    0.38    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   586300      3084 268667168  0.00  0.00    0.19    0.38    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   517840       952 268666340  0.00  0.00    0.19    0.38    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520920       544 268666164  0.00  0.00    0.19    0.38    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520780       428 268666048  0.00  0.00    0.19    0.38    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520820      2908 268668524  0.00  0.00    0.19    0.38    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520732      1788 268668636  0.00  0.00    0.19    0.39    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   521076       564 268668492  0.00  0.00    0.19    0.39    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520532       712 268668640  0.00  0.00    0.19    0.39    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520764       956 268668884  0.00  0.00    0.19    0.39    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520816       420 268668348  0.00  0.00    0.20    0.39    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520948      1332 268669260  0.00  0.00    0.20    0.39    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520784       616 268668544  0.00  0.00    0.20    0.39    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   521416       836 268668764  0.00  0.00    0.20    0.39    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520488      1240 268669168  0.00  0.00    0.20    0.40    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520824      1608 268669536  0.00  0.00    0.20    0.40    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520688      1276 268669204  0.00  0.00    0.20    0.40    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520252      1332 268669260  0.00  0.00    0.20    0.40    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   520672      1000 268668928  0.00  0.00    0.20    0.40    0    0  (Gen:  0)
134553500      5640 402973292  0.00  0.00    0.29    0.58    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   586776      2644 402966160  0.00  0.00    0.29    0.58    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   518064     26784 134342772  0.00  0.00    0.29    0.58    0    0  (Gen:  1)
   520828      3120 134343528  0.00  0.00    0.29    0.59    0    0  (Gen:  0)
   521108       756 134342668  0.00  0.00    0.30    0.59    0    0  (Gen:  0)

Here it seems we have 'live bytes' exceeding ~128MB.

The +RTS -hy profile basically just says we allocate 128MB:

I tried reproducing this behavior in a simpler program, but even with replicating the exact setup with ST, a Reader containing the Vector, same monad/program structure etc. the simple test program doesn't show this. Simplifying my big program the behavior also stops eventually when removing apparently completely unrelated code.

Qs:

  • Am I really keeping this vector around 4 times out of 20?
  • If yes, how do I actually tell since +RTS -Hy and maximum residency claim I'm not, and what can I do to stop this behavior?
  • If no, why is Haskell not GC'ing it and running out of address space / memory, and what can I do to stop this behavior?

Thanks!

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2  
Memory used is usually twice the maximum residency or more, depends on allocation and collection pattern. So the 518MB total memory used isn't alarming by itself. Try telling GHC that there is only so much memory to use, $ ./foo +RTS -M256M for example, to force it to collect earlier. But "nor is any reference retained to it outside of runST" may be untrue, you could indeed have a leak. One would need to see the code if that is the case. –  Daniel Fischer Aug 16 '13 at 18:59
    
@DanielFischer 518MB is ~4x, though. Wouldn't the out-of-memory crash with a 1GB vector indicate that GHC can't collect the memory? +RTS -M256M fails with 'Heap exhausted'. The vector is created, put inside a Reader environment, that's it. Nothing else, not sure what else I can do to avoid leaking any references after leaving ST/Reader. Like I said, I can't reproduce this problem in a simpler program. It seems rather random. –  NBFGRTW Aug 16 '13 at 19:30
    
Well, 4× can happen given the right/wrong allocation pattern. The out-of-memory crash could indicate that GHC doesn't know it should now collect, but given that -M256M cause "heap exhausted", it looks more like something has a reference to the beast after all. –  Daniel Fischer Aug 16 '13 at 19:35
    
@DanielFischer A vector allocates a single block of 128MB, how can I have a pattern nicer than this? I only build the vector with replicate and put it in the record in the reader. Removing the field causes no compiler errors besides those places, so I have some confidence it's not used. How can I retain a reference once I leave runReaderT/runST? I'm not sure how to diagnose such an issue in Haskell. –  NBFGRTW Aug 16 '13 at 20:01
    
What is the return type of your runST calculation? There might be some hidden laziness. Try deepseq or investigate with ghc-heap-view. –  Joachim Breitner Aug 16 '13 at 20:02

1 Answer 1

I suspect this is a bug in GHC and/or the RTS.

First, I'm confident there is no actual space leak or anything like that.

Reasons:

  • The vector is never used anywhere. Not read, not written, not referenced. It should be collected once runST is done. Even when the ST computation returns a single Int which is immediately printed out to evaluate it, the memory issue still exists. There is no reference to that data.
  • Every profiling mode the RTS offers is in violent agreement that I never actually have more than a single vector's worth of memory allocated/referenced. Every statistic and pretty chart says that.

Now, here's the interesting bit. If I manually force the GC by calling System.Mem.performGC after every run of my function, the problem goes away, completely.

So we have a case where the runtime has GBs worth of memory which (demonstrably!) can be reclaimed by the GC and even according to its own statistic is not held by anybody anymore. When running out of its memory pool the runtime does not collect, but instead asks the OS for more memory. And even when that finally fails, the runtime still does not collect (which would reclaim GBs of memory, demonstrably) but instead chooses to terminate the program with an out-of-memory error.

I'm no expert on Haskell, GHC or GC. But this does look awfully broken to me. I'll report this as a bug.

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