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Is there a way in iOS to programmatically check if the currently running app was installed from the iOS App Store? This is in contrast to an app that was run via Xcode, TestFlight, or any non-official distribution source.

This is in the context of an SDK that doesn't have access to the app's source code.

To be clear - I am looking for some signature, so to speak, given to the app (presumably by Apple), that will, without dependence on any preprocessor flags or other build configurations, be accessible to any application at run time.

share|improve this question
    
Please clarify. What do you mean by SDK? Are you building a library? Are you building an SDK that outputs an App à la Titanium? In that case, you're still building an app anyway, so while you might be prevented from accessing your "sub-app" source code, you're definitely in control of the running app. – magma Sep 4 '13 at 0:30
2  
To be clear - are you looking for some signature, so to speak, given to the app (presumably by Apple), that will, without dependence on any preprocessor flags or other build configurations, be accessible to any application at run time? – Carl Veazey Sep 4 '13 at 1:44
    
@CarlVeazey Yes, that is exactly is. – kevlar Sep 4 '13 at 7:24
    
@magma No, I'm am building a pure SDK that other developers download and integrate into their Xcode builds. – kevlar Sep 4 '13 at 7:25
up vote 15 down vote accepted
+100

Apps downloaded from the App Store have a iTunesMetadata.plist file added by the store:

NSString *file=[NSHomeDirectory() stringByAppendingPathComponent:@"iTunesMetadata.plist"];
if ([[NSFileManager defaultManager] fileExistsAtPath:file]) {
    // probably a store app
}

Perhaps you might want to check if this file exists.

Update:

In iOS8, the application bundle has been moved. According to @silyevsk, the plist is now one level above [the new application main bundle path], at /private/var/mobile/Containers/Bundle/Application/4A74359F-E6CD-44C9-925D-AC82E‌‌​​B5EA837/iTunesMetadata.plist, and unfortunately, this can't be accessed from the app (permission denied)

Update Nov 4th 2015:

It appears that checking the receipt name can help. It must be noted that this solution is slightly different: it doesn't return whether we're running an App Store app, but rather whether we're running a beta Testflight app. This might or might not be useful depending on your context.

On top of that, it's a very fragile solution because the receipt name could change at any time. I'm reporting it anyway, in case you have no other options:

// Objective-C
BOOL isRunningTestFlightBeta = [[[[NSBundle mainBundle] appStoreReceiptURL] lastPathComponent] isEqualToString:@"sandboxReceipt"];

// Swift
let isRunningTestFlightBeta = NSBundle.mainBundle().appStoreReceiptURL?.lastPathComponent=="sandboxReceipt"

Source: Detect if iOS App is Downloaded from Apple's Testflight

How HockeyKit does it

By combining the various checks you can guess whether the app is running in a Simulator, in a Testflight build, or in an AppStore build.

Here's a segment from HockeyKit:

BOOL bit_isAppStoreReceiptSandbox(void) {
#if TARGET_OS_SIMULATOR
  return NO;
#else
  NSURL *appStoreReceiptURL = NSBundle.mainBundle.appStoreReceiptURL;
  NSString *appStoreReceiptLastComponent = appStoreReceiptURL.lastPathComponent;

  BOOL isSandboxReceipt = [appStoreReceiptLastComponent isEqualToString:@"sandboxReceipt"];
  return isSandboxReceipt;
#endif
}

BOOL bit_hasEmbeddedMobileProvision(void) {
  BOOL hasEmbeddedMobileProvision = !![[NSBundle mainBundle] pathForResource:@"embedded" ofType:@"mobileprovision"];
  return hasEmbeddedMobileProvision;
}

BOOL bit_isRunningInTestFlightEnvironment(void) {
#if TARGET_OS_SIMULATOR
  return NO;
#else
  if (bit_isAppStoreReceiptSandbox() && !bit_hasEmbeddedMobileProvision()) {
    return YES;
  }
  return NO;
#endif
}

BOOL bit_isRunningInAppStoreEnvironment(void) {
#if TARGET_OS_SIMULATOR
  return NO;
#else
  if (bit_isAppStoreReceiptSandbox() || bit_hasEmbeddedMobileProvision()) {
    return NO;
  }
  return YES;
#endif
}

BOOL bit_isRunningInAppExtension(void) {
  static BOOL isRunningInAppExtension = NO;
  static dispatch_once_t checkAppExtension;

  dispatch_once(&checkAppExtension, ^{
    isRunningInAppExtension = ([[[NSBundle mainBundle] executablePath] rangeOfString:@".appex/"].location != NSNotFound);
  });

  return isRunningInAppExtension;
}

Source: GitHub - bitstadium/HockeySDK-iOS - BITHockeyHelper.m

A possible Swift class, based on HockeyKit's class, could be:

//
//  WhereAmIRunning.swift
//  https://gist.github.com/mvarie/63455babc2d0480858da
//
//  ### Detects whether we're running in a Simulator, TestFlight Beta or App Store build ###
//
//  Based on https://github.com/bitstadium/HockeySDK-iOS/blob/develop/Classes/BITHockeyHelper.m
//  Inspired by http://stackoverflow.com/questions/18282326/how-can-i-detect-if-the-currently-running-app-was-installed-from-the-app-store
//  Created by marcantonio on 04/11/15.
//

import Foundation

class WhereAmIRunning {

    // MARK: Public

    func isRunningInTestFlightEnvironment() -> Bool{
        if isSimulator() {
            return false
        } else {
            if isAppStoreReceiptSandbox() && !hasEmbeddedMobileProvision() {
                return true
            } else {
                return false
            }
        }
    }

    func isRunningInAppStoreEnvironment() -> Bool {
        if isSimulator(){
            return false
        } else {
            if isAppStoreReceiptSandbox() || hasEmbeddedMobileProvision() {
                return false
            } else {
                return true
            }
        }
    }

    // MARK: Private

    private func hasEmbeddedMobileProvision() -> Bool{
        if let _ = NSBundle.mainBundle().pathForResource("embedded", ofType: "mobileprovision") {
            return true
        }
        return false
    }

    private func isAppStoreReceiptSandbox() -> Bool {
        if isSimulator() {
            return false
        } else {
            if let appStoreReceiptURL = NSBundle.mainBundle().appStoreReceiptURL,
                let appStoreReceiptLastComponent = appStoreReceiptURL.lastPathComponent
                where appStoreReceiptLastComponent == "sandboxReceipt" {
                    return true
            }
            return false
        }
    }

    private func isSimulator() -> Bool {
        #if arch(i386) || arch(x86_64)
            return true
            #else
            return false
        #endif
    }

}

Gist: GitHub - mvarie/WhereAmIRunning.swift

share|improve this answer
    
"NSHomeDirectory()" would return a path of "~/iTunesMetadata.plist", which sounds like it is outside the app sandbox. Are you certain this is the right path to check? – Michael Dautermann Sep 4 '13 at 19:04
2  
@MichaelDautermann : good point! However in iOS NSHomeDirectory() behaves differently: "In iOS, the home directory is the application’s sandbox directory. In OS X, it is the application’s sandbox directory or the current user’s home directory (if the application is not in a sandbox)" – magma Sep 4 '13 at 22:40
    
Will try this out and verify if it works or not, thanks for the suggestion. – kevlar Sep 5 '13 at 2:19
    
@kevlar - this stopped working for me in ios8, did you see the same behavior – ekeren Jul 6 '15 at 13:58
1  
Actually, it's one level above, at /private/var/mobile/Containers/Bundle/Application/4A74359F-E6CD-44C9-925D-AC82E‌‌​​B5EA837/iTunesMetadata.plist, and unfortunately, this can't be accessed from the app (permission denied) – silyevsk Jul 13 '15 at 8:11

If you're talking about your own app, you could add a state that returns true if it was build as part of a Store version (e.g. a compiler conditional) and false in every other case.

If you're talking about another app, it's not easy or straightforward (or maybe not even possible) to query other apps outside of your sandbox.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your quick response Michael. I've edited my question to specify that I'm building an SDK, so I don't have direct access to the app's code. Do you know any workaround for that? – kevlar Aug 16 '13 at 22:51

My observation is when a device connected to Xcode, and then we open Organiser, switch to Devices pane it will list all Applications which is not installed from App Store. So what you have to do is download Xcode, then connect your device, go to Devices pane and see which all applications are installed from non-App Store sources. This is the simplest solution.

share|improve this answer
1  
I believe Kevlar wants to be able to do this programatically -- that is, from within his code -- and not manually via Xcode. – Michael Dautermann Sep 4 '13 at 20:04

You can use the DEBUG preprocessor macro to determine if Xcode built the app, or if it was built for the App Store.

BOOL isInAppStore = YES;

#ifdef DEBUG
    isInAppStore = NO;
#endif

This should set the BOOL to NO for every case except when downloaded from the App Store.

share|improve this answer
1  
Isn't that just a per-app build setting depending on whether or not it's a debug or release build? I make release builds all the time without the DEBUG macro. – kevlar Sep 5 '13 at 2:15
    
Right, but you can use it to determine if the app was downloaded from the App Store. This is what we do in our static library SDK to determine whether to log to the console or not. I'm not sure, however, why you need this knowledge accessible from any application on the phone? What is it you are trying to do? – Mark Sep 5 '13 at 3:41
1  
Wait, that can't be right. If a developer uses our release SDK and then runs a test build themselves, our release SDK will think it was an app download. – kevlar Sep 5 '13 at 3:47
    
Really? I thought that the static lib would use the DEBUG macro of the project it's contained in. Hmm I'll have to look into this more. – Mark Sep 5 '13 at 3:51
1  
I believe that once you compile your static lib (or framework), all the code is already set. DEBUG is after all a preprocessor macro. I've confirmed this by running apps with release builds but including our debug SDK, and of course our SDK's debug macros kick into effect and log stuff. – kevlar Sep 5 '13 at 3:57

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