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Consider the following JavaScript code:

function getFunction(x) {
    var closureMember = x;

    return function() {
        return closureMember * 2;
    };
}

var f = getFunction(5);

Here a call to getFunction creates a closure containing the member closureMember, returns an anonymous function referencing this closure, and assigns it to the variable f. If I invoke the anonymous function, its code will be executed and the member closureMember in the closure will be actually accessed.

JavaScript allows me to invoke the method toString on an anonymous function that returns the textual representation of its code. In this case, the representation will contain the name of closureMember without giving any access to the actual variable (note that it can exists in multiple instances if getFunction was invoked multiple times).

Question:
Does JavaScript provide any reflection capabilities that would allow to analyze/modify the structure and content of closures associated with function instances at runtime?

share|improve this question
1  
Sure, add properties to the returned function, and use them. jsfiddle.net/r4Q3j – Ian Aug 16 '13 at 21:31
1  
The question is about if such a feature exists, not about possible workarounds involving modification of code returning a function. – Լ.Ƭ. Aug 16 '13 at 21:34
2  
@Ian I believe the OP is looking for access to closureMember without modifying getFunction. – bfavaretto Aug 16 '13 at 21:34
    
@Լ.Ƭ. I don't understand what you mean by "workaround". Maybe I'm misunderstanding "reflection capabilities". What do you want to be able to do? – Ian Aug 16 '13 at 21:38
2  
Quick answer: no, that's not possible. – bfavaretto Aug 16 '13 at 21:39

I'm not sure that it's exactly what you want but the next code works fine.

function getFunction(x) {
    var closureMember = x;

    return function() {
        return closureMember * 2;
    };
}

function changeClosure(x, closure){ 
    var closureMember = x; 
    return eval("(" + closure.toString() + ")");
}

var f = getFunction(5);
var g = changeClosure(42, f);

g();
share|improve this answer

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