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I have an idea for a mobile/web application that collects data from users. The data would be tied to a user ID and timestamp and would be stored possibly like this (likely in Mongo):

DataPointID     DataValue         Timestamp
-----------------------------------------------------
382             true              2013-07-02 16:54:01
120             1845              2013-07-02 16:54:01
322             217               2013-07-02 16:54:01
005             false             2013-07-02 16:54:01
218             'lorem ipsum...'  2013-07-02 16:54:01
890             111               2013-07-02 16:54:01

The idea is to take this data and somehow correlate it over time. So if a user always enters in value 10 for DataPointID 123 every time they enter in value 20 for DataPointID 601, then the application can notify the user of the pattern.

Most of the research I've done ended up taking me to Wikipedia articles about crazy algorithms that haven't been very helpful.

So the question: what is a practical way to find patterns in random data?

My thought was to use Node JS and Mongo to build the API and application. Would there be a better technology or methods or perhaps some recommended libraries that could do what I need?

UPDATE:

Here is a more concrete example of how this might work:

For example, say a person is tracking what they eat, sleep quality, symptoms, etc. Sleep can cause various symptoms, what you eat can affect sleep and cause symptoms. Symptoms can affect what you eat and how you sleep. Any and all these types of patterns I'd like to be able to identify.

Thanks!

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If the data is random, it is not supposed to have patterns. If you are getting patterns, you are doing it wrong. –  Anony-Mousse Aug 17 '13 at 9:54
    
I'm voting to close the question as this is far too broad for a good StackOverflow answer. –  WiredPrairie Aug 17 '13 at 21:10

3 Answers 3

If the patterns that you are trying to detect are as simple as same values you could calculate the mean and standard variation of each data point each time the user updates them. Then have some criteria for minimum number of entries/updates for each data point and max standard deviation before it was considered a pattern.

Probably your requirements are much more complicated than that and like most real-world AI problems its going to take a grind to get an answer. Some kind of Neural Gas may be required to just "find" the patterns for you.

Perhaps if you can try to be more specific about the type of pattern that would be considered significant it would help people narrow down the problem.

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1  
Thanks for the answer. Like you said, my requirements are much more complicated. In this app there would be many different types of data collected, any of which could correspond to changes in the other. For example, say a person is tracking what they eat, sleep quality, symptoms, etc. Sleep can cause various symptoms, what you eat can affect sleep and cause symptoms. Symptoms can affect what you eat and how you sleep. Any and all these types of patterns I'd like to be able to identify. Does that better explain? –  Dustin Martin Aug 17 '13 at 2:03

If the data is really random, there are no patterns! Simple periodic patterns can be picked up with (for example) Markov models, but in general you have to use your knowledge of the actual source of the data to tease out useful information.

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Perhaps random is the wrong word. See the example I added to better understand what I'm trying to do. –  Dustin Martin Aug 17 '13 at 2:07

The practical way you are looking for is:

try out lots and lots and lots of stuff.

And spend more time on preprocessing the data than on running algorithms.

There is no general purpose "one-click solution", sorry.

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