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So I have this input file:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
3 2 4 1 6 5 7
***
1 1 2
1 1 2
***end of input***

I want to scan the first two lines of integers, then something with them, then skip the * and scan the next lines of integers, and do something with them as well (like a loop until it reads *).

How could I do that? Here's my code:

int main(){
int i = 0, j ;
int temp[100];
char c, buf[20];
FILE *fp;
fp = fopen("input.txt", "r");
    if (fp != NULL){

            while (1 == fscanf(fp, "%d ", &temp[i])){
                i++;
            }   
                            // do something with the integers
    }
    else{
        printf("Cannot open File!\n");   
    }

return 0;
}

So the problem is, I can only scan the first two lines of integers. I want to scan the integers after the * as well.

share|improve this question
    
what is the ending character? –  Shamim Hafiz Aug 17 '13 at 0:27
    
What exactly is the problem you are encountering? –  fvu Aug 17 '13 at 0:28
    
It sounds like you need to (a) add code after the 'do something' line to deal with lines containing stars (like read it with fgets()), and then wrap another loop around the while, the 'do something' and the 'munch stars' code to repeat until EOF. Ideally, you should close the file after you've encountered EOF. It is also probably sensible to remove the space after the %d in the format string — the reasons are complex, but trailing white space gives nasty behaviour to interactive programs in particular. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 17 '13 at 0:33
    
The problem is, I can only scan the first two lines of integers. I want to scan the next integers after the * as well. @JonathanLeffler Could help me and provide a code for that? For a while loop –  James Reynald Mase Aug 17 '13 at 0:46
    
What's stopping you from adding an outer while loop around your current while loop and "do something" code to repeat the operation? "Could help me and provide a code for that?" -- That's really not what SO is about. –  Jim Balter Aug 17 '13 at 1:28

3 Answers 3

Maybe you could do something like this (needs ctype.h):

int ch;
/* read file char by char til its end */
while ((ch = fgetc(file)) != EOF)
{
  if (isdigit(ch))
  {
    /* char is a digit */
    /* do s.th. with it */
    printf("digit=%d\n", (char)ch);
  }
  else if (ch == '\n')
  {
    /* new line */
    /* count lines or do s.th. else */
  }
}

I am not pretty sure, what your problem is. Maybe this helps you a bit.

Edit: You can also check each character, if it's a '*' with a simple if(-else) statement.

share|improve this answer

Comment:

It sounds like you need to (a) add code after the 'do something' line to deal with lines containing stars (like read it with fgets()), and then wrap another loop around the while, the 'do something' and the 'munch stars' code to repeat until EOF. Ideally, you should close the file after you've encountered EOF. It is also probably sensible to remove the space after the %d in the format string — the reasons are complex, but trailing white space gives nasty behaviour to interactive programs in particular.

Outline:

if (fp != NULL)
{
    int c;
    do
    {
        i = 0;
        while (fscanf(fp, "%d", &temp[i]) == 1)
            i++;
        if (i > 0)  
            do_something(i, temp);
        while ((c = getc(fp)) != EOF && c != '\n')
            ;
    } while (c != EOF);
    fclose(fp);
}

I don't often use a do ... while loop, but it works OK here because the body of the inner loop doesn't do anything silly (like assume there was valid input when there wasn't). The code will work correctly if there are several consecutive lines of stars, doing nothing in between them (because i will be zero each time).

Note that I didn't use fgets() to read the line of stars, but it would be possible to do so:

if (fp != NULL)
{
    char line[4096];
    do
    {
        i = 0;
        while (fscanf(fp, "%d", &temp[i]) == 1)
            i++;
        if (i > 0)  
            do_something(i, temp);
    } while (fgets(line, sizeof(line), fp) != 0);
    fclose(fp);
}

Sample code

Whichever of the two solutions outlined above is used, the code works on the sample data in the same way:

#include <stdio.h>

static void do_something(int n, int *arr)
{
    printf("data (%d items):", n);
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        printf(" %d", arr[i]);
    putchar('\n');
}

int main(void)
{
    int i = 0;
    int temp[100];
    FILE *fp = fopen("input.txt", "r");
    if (fp != NULL)
    {
    char line[4096];
    do
    {
        i = 0;
        while (fscanf(fp, "%d", &temp[i]) == 1)
            i++;
        if (i > 0)  
            do_something(i, temp);
    } while (fgets(line, sizeof(line), fp) != 0);
    fclose(fp);
    }
    /*
    {
        int c;
        do
        {
            i = 0;
            while (fscanf(fp, "%d", &temp[i]) == 1)
                i++;
            if (i > 0)  
                do_something(i, temp);
            while ((c = getc(fp)) != EOF && c != '\n')
                ;
        } while (c != EOF);
        fclose(fp);
    }
    */
    else
    {
        printf("Cannot open File!\n");   
    }

    return 0;
}

Output

data (14 items): 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 3 2 4 1 6 5 7
data (6 items): 1 1 2 1 1 2
share|improve this answer
    
I tried using your code. It printed the result that I wanted but It has additional output number printed as well. IDK where the hell did it all came from. Expected output: 3 2 4 7 5 6 1 2 1 1 Output: 3 2 4 7 5 6 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 -67 blah blah –  James Reynald Mase Aug 17 '13 at 3:04
    
In the part of the code where: if (i > 0) do_something(i, temp); while ((c = getc(fp)) != EOF && c != '\n') ; Do I have to put something inside the while loop? –  James Reynald Mase Aug 17 '13 at 3:07
    
No; the empty statement ; is sufficient in the body of that loop. The semicolon is on a line on its own to emphasize that it is an empty statement; including the semicolon on the same line as the while would be legitimate but easy to overlook. You could dress the semicolon up with (void)0; or continue;, but the semicolon on a line on its own indented appropriately is the conventional way to write the code. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 17 '13 at 4:06
    
Missed the update to your 'last comment was cut' comment. I'm not sure why you'd expect 3 2 4 7 5 6 1 2 1 1 from the input data quoted in the question (which starts with 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 3 2 4 1 6 5 7). If you want to update your question with the alternative sample input file that you have, along with the output you expect, then I can see why my program produces what it does. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 17 '13 at 4:22

You are doing good but the only thing is you are not reading the whole file. You can achieve this by doing a simple modification like....

int main(){

    int i = 0, j;

    int temp[100];

    char c, buf[20];

    FILE *fp;

    fp = fopen("input.txt", "r");

    while ((c=getc(fp))!=EOF){  //here you are reading the whole file

        while (1 == fscanf(fp, "%d ", &temp[i])){
            i++;
        }   
        // do something with the integers
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read the About page soon. Note that the return value from getc() is an int so c should be an int. Using getc() like that means that the first number will be skipped, which is not a good idea, I think. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 17 '13 at 8:08

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