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I have looked at animations, and they usually seem very smooth/clean, but when I view mine, they seem to have ghosting or a tail per say. They also seem choppier. I don't know what causes it, and I am not sure how I can fix it. I don't know if it is because of my game loop, or my paint methods.

Here is a short (Super Short) video of what it looks like

When I see other games items move really nice, how do I achieve that?

@Override
public void paint(Graphics g){
    this.dbImage = createImage(this.getWidth(), this.getHeight());
    this.dbg = dbImage.getGraphics();
    this.paintComponent(dbg);
    g.drawImage(this.dbImage, 0, 0, this);
}

/**
 *
 * @param g
 *
 * Draws out all of the GameObjects in the room
 */
@Override
public void paintComponent(Graphics g){
    try{
        g.drawImage(bg, 0, 0, this);
        for(GameObject go : this.gameObjects){
            g.drawImage(go.getSprite(), go.getX(), go.getY(), this);
        }
        //this.repaint();
    }catch(Exception e){
    }
}

This is without the paint() Method:

No Paint

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2  
Have you tried reusing your BufferedImage instead of creating a new one in every paint call? –  NG. Aug 17 '13 at 0:37
    
No, how would I do that? –  Ryan Naddy Aug 17 '13 at 0:38
    
Well the goal would be to minimize object creation during paint. What does your createImage call do? Can you reuse that image buffer? The method implies you are creating a new image every time. You may want to also run it through a profiler and see where things are taking up time - it is difficult to tell what the problem is with the current code shown –  NG. Aug 17 '13 at 0:41
    
create image is just the size of the frame: docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/awt/…;, int) –  Ryan Naddy Aug 17 '13 at 0:47
    
so what you could try is calling createImage in the constructor or some intializer, and store that as a member. The point is not to do anything really expensive in your paint routines –  NG. Aug 17 '13 at 0:49

2 Answers 2

There's a technique called double buffer that makes the animation looks more smooth. Here's a sample of how to do it:

  1. Declare a field of type BufferedImage: BufferedImage backbuffer

  2. Create the double buffer: backbuffer = new BufferedImage(screenWidth, screenHeight, BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_RGB);

  3. Use the graphics provided by the BufferedImage to draw your view: g2d = backbuffer.createGraphics();

    g2d.drawImage(...);

    Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
The OP double buffering. Look at his code again. The problem is probably creating a new image each paint call. –  William Morrison Aug 17 '13 at 0:52
    
You're right. Anyways I think that may be a good idea think about using double buffering. –  Gabriel Fernandes Aug 17 '13 at 0:56

Here's how I would write it. Comments explain the process.

//in constructor, and whenever your component resizes
this.dbImage = createImage(this.getWidth(), this.getHeight());

@Override
public void paint(Graphics g){
    //probably shouldn't have a class instance of graphics.
    Graphics2D dbg = dbImage.createGraphics();
    //clear offscreen buffer image.
    dbg.fillRectangle(0,0,dbImage.getWidth(),dbImage.getHeight());
    //render a new frame to offscreen buffer
    this.paintComponent(dbg);
    //render offscreen buffer to component
    g.drawImage(this.dbImage, 0, 0, this);
    gdb.dispose();
}

Edit:

Here's how you would clear the component screen.

@Override
public void paintComponent(Graphics g){
    super.paintComponent(g);
    //alternatively, g.fillRectangle(0,0,getWidth(),getHeight());

    try{
        g.drawImage(bg, 0, 0, this);
        for(GameObject go : this.gameObjects){
            g.drawImage(go.getSprite(), go.getX(), go.getY(), this);
        }
        //this.repaint();
    }catch(Exception e){
    }
}

The screenshot you posted looks like you're either not clearing your JComponent, or you're not clearing your offscreen buffer dbImage.

share|improve this answer
    
By doing this, where do I decide where each item should be before the frame is drawn? –  Ryan Naddy Aug 17 '13 at 1:05
    
The same way as before. Nothing's really changed in your logic other than now you're reusing your offscreen image. The buffer's origin is 0,0 and so is the frame. It won't be a problem until you begin moving items outside the frame's bounds. Then you'll need to look into Graphics.setTransform(AffineTransform) –  William Morrison Aug 17 '13 at 1:09
    
Okay, I have updated my code to look like yours but I am getting an error message... See post update. –  Ryan Naddy Aug 17 '13 at 1:31
    
Fixed the error message I needed to use a BufferedImage not an Image –  Ryan Naddy Aug 17 '13 at 1:44
    
Updated. This should fix your problem. –  William Morrison Aug 17 '13 at 2:44

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