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I am new to css and not a programmer. I understand what a class is and I understand what a div is, but what I can't seem to find, is how to set styles per div.

Any help appreciated,

Joost Verplancke

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-1 the simplest CSS tutorials answer questions like this one. You didn't even try –  DaClown May 25 '10 at 11:14
    
I don't know how to say this without being mean, but if you think you need to know how to set styles per div, then you don't really understand what divs or classes are yet. I can't think of a good reason to ever set a style on a specific 'div' - you should always write styles for a piece of content, not the type of element it's in, especially when you're dealing with a neutral element like a div. This usually means selecting via an ID or class, or combination. If I were you, I'd check out some articles on semantic HTML: Start writing good HTML, and CSS becomes a whole lot easier! –  Beejamin May 25 '10 at 12:29

5 Answers 5

In your HTML

<div class="myClass">Look at me!</div>

In your CSS

.myClass
{
   background-color:#eee;
}

EDIT

As pointed out by Dave, you can assign multiple classes to an element. This means you can modularise you styles as required. Helps with the DRY principle.

For example, in your HTML

<div class="myClass myColor">Look at me too!</div>

In your CSS

.myClass
{
   background-color:#eee;
   color:#1dd;
}

.myColor
{
   color:#111;
}

You should also note, that the order in the class attribute does not matter if different styles have conflicting settings. That is, class="myClass myColor" is exactly the same as class="myColor myClass". Which conflicting setting is actually used is determined by which style is defined last in the CSS.

This means, in the above example, to make the color from myClass be used instead of the color from myColor, you have to change your CSS to switch them around as follows

.myColor
{
   color:#111;
}

.myClass
{
   background-color:#eee;
   color:#1dd;
}
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1  
+1. Also, it might be helpful to also point out that you can also assign multiple css style classes to a single div separated by spaces, for example: <div class="myClass yourClass">Look at me!</div> –  Dave Paroulek Dec 1 '09 at 20:07
    
Indeed. Good addition Dave. –  Dan McGrath Dec 1 '09 at 20:17
    
Actually, @Dan McG, cascading order is a bit more than which is defined first. But in most cases yes, it is just which is defined first. w3.org/TR/CSS21/cascade.html#cascading-order –  ANeves May 25 '10 at 11:22
    
Thanks, but if you look at my answer I already link to the same link for those interested in the more in depth details. Maybe I could be clearer but I didn't want too many details complicating a 'beginner' question. Same reason you don't teach special relativity when first explaining Newton's Three Laws of Motion –  Dan McGrath May 25 '10 at 11:40

You would create either a class per div or give each div a unique id value.

You would then create a different CSS style for each class or id, which would style the corresponding div element.

#specialDiv {
    font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans-Serif;
}

<div id="specialDiv">Content</div>

Or

.specialDiv {
    font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans-Serif;
}

<div class="specialDiv">Content</div>

You could also do inline styles for each div element:

<div style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, Sans-Serif;">Content</div>
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 <div class="featured">Featured</div>

 <style type="text/css">
      .featured { padding:5px; font-size:1.4em; background-color:light-yellow; }
 </style>

To access the class use (.) and ids use (#) before the name.

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If you need to set the style once and only once you want to do this:

#test 
 {
  background-color: red;
 }

If you may need to reuse it (a class) then you'll want to do something like this:

.test
 {
  background-color: red;
 }

Then when you are ready to use it just:

<div id="test"> this is a test </div>

For # type and:

<div class="test"> this is a test </div>

For the class type.

My recommendation is to go to: http://www.w3schools.com/css/

Plenty of help about CSS there. I would try to avoid the inline css as it sometimes has a way of making artists / programmers think that it is just easier to use inline. You end up with a web page with all these inline styles that could really be centralized and reused. So be careful with inline. I do not recommend using them

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<div style="your css goes here"></div>

Edit - Don't do that, annakata is right. I misunderstood your question. You've gotten a lot of really good answers already that give you the information you're asking about.

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2  
-1 please don't do this, inline styles are toxic. You'll be killing yourself debugging and maintaining the lack of abstraction. –  annakata Dec 1 '09 at 19:52
    
@annakata - You're right, I misunderstood the asker. HTML isn't something I do often, but that makes complete sense. –  Heather Dec 1 '09 at 20:05

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