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Below is my attempt at generic representation of a linked list, where i pass an example with integers. I know that the problem is with how i am assigning next (through the add_to_list function), but after staring at screen for 2 hours i still have no clue what is wrong. Could someone guide me through it?

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

/** Class Definition here */

template<typename  T>
class Linklist
{
    struct node
    {
        node(T value,node* next=NULL):value(value),next(next) {}
        node* next;
        T value;
    };
    node* head;
    node* curr;

public:
    Linklist(node* n=0):head(n) {}
    ~Linklist();
    void add_to_list(T value, bool x=1);
    void print();

};

/** Class destructor */
template<typename T>
Linklist<T>::~Linklist()
{
    node *ptr ;
    while(head!=NULL)
    {
        ptr=head;
        head=head->next;
        delete ptr;
    }
}


template <typename T >
void Linklist<T>::add_to_list(T x, bool z)
// bool basically means if to add the element to beginning or end of list, 1 for end.
{
    node* k=new node(x);
    if(head==NULL)
    {
        k->value=x;
        k->next=NULL;
        head=curr=k;
    }
    else
    {
        k->value=x;
        k->next=NULL;
        if (z==1)
        {
            curr->next=k;
            curr=k;
        }
        else
        {
            k->next=head;
            head=k;
        }
    }
    delete(k);

}

template<typename T>
void Linklist<T>::print()
{
    node* ptr= new node(1);
    ptr=head;
    if (ptr==NULL)
    {
        return ;
    }
    else
    {
        cout<<"reached here \n " <<"pointer is"<<ptr->value<<"\n next is"<<ptr->next;
        while(ptr!=NULL)
        {
            cout<<ptr->value<<"-->";
            ptr=ptr->next;
        }
    }
}


int main()
{
    Linklist<int> *intlist=new Linklist<int>();
    intlist->add_to_list(20,0);
    intlist->add_to_list(344,1);
    intlist->print();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
What output are you seeing? –  andy256 Aug 17 '13 at 5:41
    
You missed the actual problem. –  chris Aug 17 '13 at 5:41
    
@andy256, just the first element (i.e 1-->) I checked with step by step analysis that the next function returns 0 everytime but cant see why. –  Akash Rupela Aug 17 '13 at 5:43
    
@chris , I know i missed something but dont know what lol . can you help? –  Akash Rupela Aug 17 '13 at 5:46
    
node* ptr= new node(1); ptr=head; is a bad sequence. You insta-leak memory because nothing refers to the memory you allocate anymore. Also, your main function does not need a pointer. A normal object is fine (and better). –  chris Aug 17 '13 at 5:50
show 9 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You delete(k); after you add it to the list so the system can use the memory for new objects. You should not delete it since you are still using that memory

When you don't delete it the output is:

reached here
pointer is20
next is0020882020-->344-->

not related to the bug, but you should avoid new when you can, such as your main code:

Linklist<int> intlist;
intlist.add_to_list(20,0);
intlist.add_to_list(344,1);
intlist.print();
share|improve this answer
    
Super Facepalm! Well thankyou :) –  Akash Rupela Aug 17 '13 at 5:51
1  
You are correct that calling delete it the problem but the compiler doesn't "put junk" in the node after deleting it. It just makes the memory available to be used for something else. –  Blastfurnace Aug 17 '13 at 5:51
    
Okay. So i will basically call the deconstuctor to free that memory. Learnt so many concepts in so little time so its a little load on the brain :) –  Akash Rupela Aug 17 '13 at 6:00
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