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I plan to trigger many custom javascript events, and listen for them like

$(document).trigger('changeSettings',['param1value']);

$(document).on('changeSettings',function(e,param1){
    // do something
});

Should I bind these on() events to something other than $(document)? Is it a bad practice to bind lots of listeners to $(document) or $('body')?

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2  
Is your changeSettings "event" an "event" that has nothing to do with the DOM? Is it more of an event that you are using in your JavaScript to broadcast "events"? –  Ian Aug 17 '13 at 5:46
    
Yes, not really related to any element –  d-_-b Aug 17 '13 at 5:51
1  
I don't know if this is any "better", but it doesn't interact with the DOM (although I wouldn't be surprised if jQuery internally does a lot more with .trigger(), but here: jsfiddle.net/Kh4HC . You could probably remove the events variable; that was just my way of defining what's "allowed". This could all be avoided and a small triggering library could be made to steer clear of the DOM altogether –  Ian Aug 17 '13 at 6:02
    
i don't think its a bad practice document and window are ment to do all the global things. –  Hemant_Negi Aug 17 '13 at 6:07

3 Answers 3

While this will work, it's probably best (from a readability and performance standpoint) to use a dedicated event library. If you don't want to do that, this is a neater way to do it.

jQuery allows creation of documentFragments, which just live in memory as an object. It isn't added to your page, and events can only be triggered on it by using the returned value (here stored in window.events).

window.events = $('<div>');

events.on('changeSettings',function(e,param1){
    // do something
});

events.trigger('changeSettings', ['value']);

fiddle


Here's an example using radio.js, which does events and nothing else.

radio('changeSettings').subscribe(function(data1, data2) {
    //do something with data1 and data2
});
radio('changeSettings').broadcast(data1, data2);

You could also do something like this, which allows refactoring and minification.

var events = {changeSettings: radio('changeSettings')};

events.changeSettings.subscribe(function(data1, data2) {
    //do something with data1 and data2
});
events.changeSettings.broadcast(data1, data2);
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1  
will it add this new event to all the divs, i don't understand the reason of window.events = $('<div>'); –  Hemant_Negi Aug 17 '13 at 6:09
4  
No, it creates a documentFragment containing a div. It's a div that just lives in memory, so it never appears on the page, and you don't have to worry about conflict with elements like document. You can add a click event and be sure that it'll never be triggered other than by your code. –  FakeRainBrigand Aug 17 '13 at 6:15
1  
its more explanatory please add this to your answer. –  Hemant_Negi Aug 17 '13 at 6:20
1  
@FakeRainBrigand, It doesn't wrap the div element in a documentFragment, it just creates an in-memory div element, as you can see here jsfiddle.net/yKjE9 –  plalx Aug 17 '13 at 6:52
1  
@plalx I don't understand what you mean. $("<div>") will internally use document.createElement("div")...no container there, especially not a documentFragment. I can't tell if you're "arguing" with my comment or trying to reinforce yours and add to it. If it wasn't apparent, I was agreeing with your comment and/or adding to it. Unless I'm missing something, our comments seem to be in agreement with each other –  Ian Aug 18 '13 at 4:20

I don't know if it would be any "better", but the following doesn't interact with the DOM - it keeps a reference to a non-appended element and deals with it. Although I wouldn't be surprised if jQuery internally does a lot more with .trigger() anyways. If these events have nothing to do with the DOM, then stay away from it :) Here's an example:

var Events = (function () {
    "use strict";

    var trigger, events, onMethod, triggerMethod;

    trigger = $("<div>");
    events = {
        test1: 1,
        test2: 1
    };
    onMethod = function (eventName, func) {
        if (events[eventName]) {
            trigger.on(eventName, func);
        }
    };
    triggerMethod = function (eventName) {
        trigger.triggerHandler(eventName, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1));
    };

    return {
        on: onMethod,
        trigger: triggerMethod
    };
}());

Events.on("test2", function () {
    console.log(arguments);
});

Events.trigger("test2", [1, 2, 3], 3);

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/Kh4HC/

You could probably remove the events variable; that was just my way of defining what's "allowed". Any extra things done by jQuery, and the rely on jQuery could all be avoided and a small triggering library could be made to steer clear of the DOM altogether. Or, the use of one of the several good existing libraries out there would be just as fine. As a way to hopefully better help understand how this might work internally in a library, here's an example:

var Events = (function () {
    "use strict";

    var events, onMethod, triggerMethod, slice;

    events = {};
    onMethod = function (eventName, func) {
        if (!(events[eventName])) {
            events[eventName] = [];
        }
        events[eventName].push(func);
    };
    triggerMethod = function (eventName) {
        var matchedEvent, args, i, j, cur;
        matchedEvent = events[eventName];
        if (matchedEvent) {
            args = slice(arguments, 1);
            for (i = 0, j = matchedEvent.length; i < j; i++) {
                cur = matchedEvent[i];
                cur.apply(null, args);
            }
        }
    };
    slice = function (arr, start, howMany) {
        var stop, newArr, i, j, cur;

        start = +start || 0;
        howMany = +howMany || Infinity;
        stop = Math.min(start + howMany, arr.length);
        newArr = [];
        for (i = start, j = stop; i < j; i++) {
            cur = arr[i];
            newArr.push(cur);
        }
        return newArr;
    };

    return {
        on: onMethod,
        trigger: triggerMethod
    };
}());

Events.on("ahh", function () {
    console.log("ahh", arguments);
});

Events.trigger("ahh", [1, 2, 3], 3);
Events.trigger("ahh", {a: "b"}, true);

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/Zv2W8/1/

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1  
I think it's worth mentionning that with all the good event librairies out there, there is no point in making your own, other that for learning purposes. –  plalx Aug 17 '13 at 6:45
1  
@plalx Good point, I just felt like since they need a simple listen/trigger scenario, why bother with a potentially-large library when it can be done very simply? Anyways, it's a good point –  Ian Aug 17 '13 at 6:57
    
Yep, you are right that a large library would probably not be an interesting option, however I there are many small libs dedicated to that purpose only, for instance microjs.com/#event –  plalx Aug 18 '13 at 1:53
    
@plalx Yeah, you're right, I shouldn't have mentioned the whole "bloated library" excuse. While I still agree with your comment, I still think there's nothing wrong with recreating something as small as this. It's not like there's many features that need to be included, and it's not like there's browser inconsistencies you need to overcome with this type of project. Still, I'll add it to my answer –  Ian Aug 18 '13 at 4:23

If your events aren't DOM-related, it's probably not a good practice to fire them on DOM elements. What you can do instead (I noticed you are using jQuery) is to use a new jQuery object as an event bus.

For example:

var eventBus = $({});

//listen for the event
eventBus.on('changeSettings', function (e) {
    console.log('changeSettings triggered ', e.settings); 
});

//fire the event
var evt = $.Event('changeSettings');
evt.settings = { someSetting: 1 };

eventBus.trigger(evt);

However, you should not broadcast all your events through an event bus, only the events that might be of interest globally for multiple parts of your app. For instance, an event like 'userInfosChanged' might be interesting to broadcast, since a lot of your application's modules might want to react. On the other hand, there could be other events fired by some object instances that doesn't need to be broadcasted, so in that case you would register the event handler on the object instance itself.

If we get back to DOM events. One of the main reasons that we use listeners on a container element, like the document or another element containing children elements fireing events is to avoid having to attach an event handler to every children, which is more efficient in terms of memory. Also, it's a very useful approach when children can be dynamically added or removed from a container.

EDIT: If you are looking for some small libraries dedicated to events, you can consult http://microjs.com/#event

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @plalx, very helpful, short easy code! –  d-_-b Aug 17 '13 at 18:17
    
@d-_-b, Glad I could help! I also added a list of libraries dedicated to events. –  plalx Aug 18 '13 at 1:55

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