Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've read a few guides about smart pointers, and I think I understand the hang of it (no pun intended), but there's something that still bothers me about it.

Smart pointers are intended to work with pointers to data allocated on the heap using new, and once the smart pointer goes out of scope its destructor would deallocate the information the pointer points to. However, suppose I made a mistake and made the smart pointer point to an object allocated on the stack instead of on the heap. In this case I would get a nasty segmentation fault error, because I would try to use delete on a stack object.

To illustrate the problem, here are two code snippets. For this demonstration I used this implementation for smart pointers. First, the proper way to use a smart pointer

int main(void)
{
  int my_num = 17;
  int *p = new int(my_num);
  MyAuto_Ptr<int> p2(p);

  return 0;
}

and here's the buggy version, with a pointer to a stack object, which causes a segmentation fault.

int main(void)
{
  int my_num = 17;
  int *p = &my_num;
  MyAuto_Ptr<int> p2(p);

  return 0;
}

Is there any way to alert the user if a smart pointer points to a stack object?

share|improve this question
    
Replace "which causes a segmentation fault" with "which invokes undefined behavior". Just like delete p. – Elazar Aug 19 '13 at 20:55

First, the proper way to use a smart pointer

No, this is not the proper way to use a smart pointer.

The whole idea of using a smart pointer is that you never create a "raw" pointer in the first place. So your proper way would look like this:

 MyAuto_ptr<int> p(new int(my_num));

Is there any way to alert the user if a smart pointer points to a stack object?

There is no general way to do this, but a system specific runtime check may be possible.

However, when you avoid "raw" pointers, attempt to initialize a smart pointer with a stack object will immediately stick out: without thinking, you can tell this is wrong:

 MyAuto_ptr<int> p(&my_num);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.