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I've got a very basic example where I'm reading some data into a class from JSON, and my objects are getting corrupted somehow. I suspect I'm missing some detail about how properties/ARC is working, but I'm not sure what it is, or how I'd track it down.

I've reduced my original code so that the problem is obvious. However this means that its not clear why I'm using custom properties etc. - my real code has more functionality in there...

The issue can be seen in the last line of the Test.m file. The first constructed object now contains data from the second object rather than the value it originally contained.

Any advice on what I'm doing wrong and/or how to track down this kind of issue would be greatly appreciated.

ANBNote.h

@interface ANBNote : NSObject
@property (nonatomic,readwrite) NSArray* references;
- (id)initWithJson:(NSDictionary*)data;
@end

ANBNote.m

#import "ANBNote.h"

@implementation ANBNote
NSArray * _references;

-(id) init {
  if(!(self=[super init])) return nil;
  _references=@[];
  return self;
}

-(id)initWithJson:(NSDictionary *)jsonObject {      
  if(!(self = [self init] ) ) { return nil; }    
  _references = jsonObject[@"references"];    
  return self;
}

-(void) setReferences:(NSArray *)references {
  _references = references;
}

-(NSArray *)references {
  return _references;
}    

@end

Test.m

...
NSDictionary * d1 = @{@"references":@[@"r1",@"r2"]};
NSDictionary * d2 = @{@"references":@[@"q1",@"q2"]};

ANBNote * n1 = [[ANBNote alloc] initWithJson:d1];
NSLog(@"R1 = %p, %@", n1.references, n1.references); // Prints r1, r2 - as expected

ANBNote * n2 = [[ANBNote alloc] initWithJson:d2];
NSLog(@"R2 = %p, %@", n2.references, n2.references); // Prints q1, q2 - as expected
NSLog(@"R1 = %p, %@", n1.references, n1.references); // Prints q1, q2 - Oh No!

Note that if I remove custom references property functions and rely on the compiler generated version everything seems to behave correctly.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is not a ivar:

@implementation ANBNote
NSArray * _references;

it's a global. There's only one for all the instances of your class, not one for each. When the next instance sets it, the previous instances see the new values because it's the same variable. You need to put it into curly braces to make it an ivar:

@implementation ANBNote
{
    NSArray * _references;
}

There's no need to declare the variable explicitly, though -- you can still implement accessors yourself and let the compiler create the ivar as long as you use the default synthesized name (underscore + property name).

share|improve this answer
    
The issue about global vs ivars is spot on, and adding it as an ivar using {} works great. But if I remove the ivar definition I now get Use of undeclared identified '_references'... –  Michael Anderson Aug 19 '13 at 1:42
    
Your compiler must not support auto-synthesis. Depending on its exact version, you may be able to do just @synthesize references; to have the ivar created with the underscore, or (if it's old enough), you will indeed have to declare the ivar separately and then connect them with @synthesize references=_references; –  Josh Caswell Aug 19 '13 at 18:25
    
Seems in this case you can't omit the ivar : from developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/… "Note: ... If you implement both a getter and a setter for a readwrite property, or a getter for a readonly property, the compiler will assume that you are taking control over the property implementation and won’t synthesize an instance variable automatically. If you still need an instance variable, you’ll need to request that one be synthesized: @synthesize property = _property;" –  Michael Anderson Aug 20 '13 at 2:55
    
Huh. I guess I was misremembering the rules. –  Josh Caswell Aug 20 '13 at 7:18

The answer is simple, you defined NSArray *_references as a static variable not as a private variable. To do that

@implementation ANBNote{
    NSArray * _references;
}

In addition to this as of Xcode 4 you do not have to define _references object in the implementation file. You may just set a variable in the header file and then access its private accessor by just typing _ before the name of it.

For instance

@interface ANBNote
@property(strong , nonatomic) NSArray *references;
@end

@implementation ANBNote

-(id) initWithArray:(NSArray *) ar{
    if(self)
        _references = [NSArray arrayWithArray:ar];
    return self;
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
Spot on about the the static vs ivar issue - however if I remove the definition in the @implementation{...} section I get a Use of undeclared identifier '_references; error. Am I missing something? Again this issue goes away if I'm not defining any custom getter/setter functions - but in my real code they are definitely required. –  Michael Anderson Aug 19 '13 at 1:45
    
if you would set custom getter and setter you can just override -setReferences:(NSArray *) references{... } and its get method. You don't need to write NSArray *_references; again in your implementation. Btw did u write @property (strong , nonatomic) NSArray *references on your header file –  kkocabiyik Aug 19 '13 at 11:27
    
Seems the omission of the ivar advice is wrong: from developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/… "Note: ... If you implement both a getter and a setter for a readwrite property, or a getter for a readonly property, the compiler will assume that you are taking control over the property implementation and won’t synthesize an instance variable automatically. If you still need an instance variable, you’ll need to request that one be synthesized: @synthesize property = _property;" –  Michael Anderson Aug 20 '13 at 2:54

This is not the root of yout problem but change your initWithJson: to

-(id)initWithJson:(NSDictionary *)jsonObject
{      
  if(!(self = [super init] ) ) { return nil; }    
  _references = jsonObject[@"references"];    
  return self;
}

Ditch the custom setter and getter (you obviously don't need them).

In your case you can declare property simply with:

@property (strong) NSArray* references;

Change the NSArray * _references; to:

@synthesize references = _references;

You can also omit the @synthesize line in your case.

Also change _references = jsonObject[@"references"]; to:

_references = [NSArray arrayWithArray:jsonObject[@"references"]];

To sum it all together:

ANBNote.h

@interface ANBNote : NSObject
@property (strong) NSArray* references;
- (id)initWithJson:(NSDictionary*)data;
@end

ANBNote.m

#import "ANBNote.h"

@implementation ANBNote

-(id) init {
  if(!(self=[super init])) return nil;
  _references=@[];
  return self;
}

-(id)initWithJson:(NSDictionary *)jsonObject {      
  if(!(self = [super init] ) ) { return nil; }    
  _references = [NSArray arrayWithArray:jsonObject[@"references"]];    
  return self;
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your comments, however you must have missed the part of my original post that says "I've reduced my original code so that the problem is obvious. However this means that its not clear why I'm using custom properties etc. - my real code has more functionality in there..." - not using custom getter/setters is not an option for me due to that additional functionality. –  Michael Anderson Aug 19 '13 at 1:47

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