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I am using BFS to compute some paths in a graph and am computing the partial paths to each node. That is just an overview of the actual problem.

The issue in question is, let us say that I have two nodes with a link in between them. All of them have three parameters, modeled as a list with three values only.

Contents of path uptil node A is in listA, link parameters are stored in listC and the result of adding both of them go into a listB which is part of node B.

For example, listA = [0,0,1] and listC = [1,1,1]. I am doing a pairwise addition on the lists, like

listB[0] = listA[0] + listC[0]
listB[1] = listA[1] + listC[1]
listB[2] = listA[2] + listC[2]

So, at the end of the operation, I should have listB = [1,1,2]. As far as I am aware, listA should not be mutated in anyway. But when I perform this operation, listA and listB end up having the same values, even though listA is not on the LHS of any operation. Is there any Python-y concept that I am missing here? I thought lists were immutable in their original form.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're probably initializing listB like this:

listB = listA

This just makes the two variables point to the same list object. If you mutate one, you mutate the other. Clone the list instead:

listB = list(listA)
listB = listA[:]  # Or
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Brilliant. Thanks a ton. I was not aware of making one list point to the other. I had cracked my head on this for two days now thinking where I went wrong. How can I upvote this? It is not allowing me to? –  adwaraki Aug 17 '13 at 7:35
    
@adwaraki: Dunno, you probably don't have enough reputation yet (I think 15 rep is the minimum for upvoting). –  Blender Aug 17 '13 at 7:37

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