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Yesterday I went for an interview where I have been asked to create a program to find largest and smallest among 5 numbers without using array.

I know how to create the program using array.

int largestNumber;
int smallestNumber;
int numbers[n];

largestNumber=numbers[0];
smallestNumber=numbers[0];
for (i=0 ; i<n; i++)
{
if (numbers[i] > largestNumber) 
{
largest = numbers[i];
}
if (numbers[i] < smallestNumber) 
{
smallestNumber= numbers[i];
}
}

But how to create it without using array. Any help??

share|improve this question
    
So where are the numbers, if they aren't in an array? In the cloud? :-) –  xanatos Aug 17 '13 at 7:42
    
std::cin, no storage at all, just max and min –  alexbuisson Aug 17 '13 at 7:44
1  
Yes, you can do it without array. –  Elvin Mammadov Aug 17 '13 at 7:45
2  
With an array, std::minmax_element is a better solution than rolling your own. –  chris Aug 17 '13 at 7:52

10 Answers 10

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
inline const T&
max_of(const T& a, const T& b) {
    return std::max(a, b);
}

template <typename T, typename ...Args>
inline const T&
max_of(const T& a, const T& b, const Args& ...args) {
    return max_of(std::max(a, b), args...);
}

int main() {
    std::cout << max_of(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) << std::endl;
    // Or just use the std library:
    std::cout << std::max({1, 2, 3, 4, 5}) << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Oooh Variadic templates! –  xanatos Aug 17 '13 at 7:50
    
So now apply that to a set of numbers read from std::cin without using an array (or similar storage). –  RichieHindle Aug 17 '13 at 7:52
1  
That edit is important. I'm surprised no one has mentioned the initializer list form of std::max until now. –  chris Aug 17 '13 at 7:57
    
This won't work for arbitrarily sized inputs, like millions or billions of numbers. –  mvp Aug 17 '13 at 7:58
1  
@mvp: The question ask for 5... how do you come to bilions? –  Emilio Garavaglia Aug 17 '13 at 12:29

Works for any number of numbers taken from standard input:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::istream_iterator<int> it_begin(std::cin), it_end;
    auto p = std::minmax_element(it_begin, it_end);
    if (p.first != it_end)
        std::cout << "min: " << *p.first << " max: " << *p.second;
}

Disclaimer:
Technicaly, this isn't required to work by C++ standard. The minimum iterator category required for minmax_element is ForwardIterator which stream iterators are not. Once an input iterator is dereferenced or incremented, its copies are no longer guaranteed to be dereferenceable or comparable to other iterators. It Works On My MachineTM. :)

share|improve this answer
1  
+1, though I think you only need to check p.first != end, if the range is empty, p.first and p.end should be equal. –  KillianDS Aug 17 '13 at 9:19
    
@KillianDS you're right. Fixed and thanks. –  jrok Aug 17 '13 at 9:43
    
I found unfortunate the choice of identifiers for the input iterator: "begin" and "end". Although syntactically correct, they are a little confusing because they are overloading names from the STL. –  José X. Aug 17 '13 at 14:51
    
@JoséX. Point taken, better now? –  jrok Aug 17 '13 at 16:12

You can do something like this:

int min_num = INT_MAX;  //  2^31-1
int max_num = INT_MIN;  // -2^31
int input;
while (!std::cin.eof()) {
    std::cin >> input;
    min_num = min(input, min_num);
    max_num = max(input, max_num);
}
cout << "min: " << min_num; 
cout << "max: " << max_num;

This reads numbers from standard input until eof (it does not care how many you have - 5 or 1,000,000).

share|improve this answer
    
And what if I enter "hello" instead of a number? –  jrok Aug 17 '13 at 8:05
5  
This solution expects well formed input. Improving it to deal with bad input is left as an exercise for the reader. –  mvp Aug 17 '13 at 8:07
    
Fair enough! :) –  jrok Aug 17 '13 at 8:07

Let max will hold the maximum of 5 numbers. Assign the first number to max. Take the 2nd number and compare it with max if the the 2nd number is greater than max then assign it to max else do nothing. Next take the 3rd number and compare it with max , if the 3rd number is greater than max assign it to max else do nothing. Do the same for 4th and 5th number. Finally max will hold the maximum of 5 number.

share|improve this answer

This is not an efficient answer but it still works

int a,b,c,d,e,largest;
if ((a>b) and (a>c) and (a>d) and (a>e))
{    
    largest=a;
}
else if ((b>a) and (b>c) and (b>d) and (b>e))
{    
    largest=b;
}
else if ((c>a) and (c>a) and (c>d) and (c>e))
{    
    largest=c;
}
else if ((d>a) and (d>c) and (d>a) and (d>e))
{    
    largest=d;
}
else 
{
largest=e;
}

you can use similar logic to fid the smallest value

share|improve this answer

For example 5 consecutive numbers

int largestNumber;
int smallestNumber;
int number;
std::cin>>number;
largestNumber = number;
smallestNumber = number;
for (i=0 ; i<5; i++)
{
   std::cin>>number;
   if (number > largestNumber) 
   {
     largest = number;
   }
   if (numbers < smallestNumber) 
   {
     smallestNumber= number;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think that the initialization of number consumes 1 of the 5 values, implying that your for loop is 1 too large. –  EvilTeach Aug 17 '13 at 15:08

You could use list (or vector), which is not an array:

#include<list>
#include<algorithm>
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    list<int> l;
    l.push_back(3); 
    l.push_back(9); 
    l.push_back(30);    
    l.push_back(0); 
    l.push_back(5); 

    list<int>::iterator it_max = max_element(l.begin(), l.end());
    list<int>::iterator it_min = min_element(l.begin(), l.end());

    cout << "Max: " << *it_max << endl;
    cout << "Min: " << *it_min << endl;
}
share|improve this answer

The > and < are transitive properties, so if a > b and b > c, then a > c. So you can

int a=10, b=6, c=4, d=21, e=4;

int maxNum = a;
int maxNum = max(b, maxNum);
int maxNum = max(c, maxNum);
int maxNum = max(d, maxNum);
int maxNum = max(e, maxNum);
share|improve this answer

Use a sorting network!

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>

int main()
{
    int a, b, c, d, e;
    std::cin >> a >> b >> c >> d >> e;

    if (a < b) std::swap(a, b);
    if (d < e) std::swap(d, e);
    if (c < e) std::swap(c, e);
    if (c < d) std::swap(c, d);
    if (b < e) std::swap(b, e);
    if (a < d) std::swap(a, d);
    if (a < c) std::swap(a, c);
    if (b < d) std::swap(b, d);
    if (b < c) std::swap(b, c);

    std::cout << "largest = " << a << '\n';
    std::cout << "smallest = " << e << '\n';
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why sort when the task doesn't require sorting? –  Violet Giraffe Aug 17 '13 at 9:21
    
@VioletGiraffe: I was a little bored so my answer isn't completely serious. –  Blastfurnace Aug 17 '13 at 9:37

If you like to keep things simple, then here is my solution.

It works for any number of integers taken from standard input. It also works for negative integers. Enter end when you are done.

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
int max,min,input;
std::cout<<"Enter the number: ";
std::cin>>input;
min=max=input;

while(std::cin>>input){
    if(input>max) max=input;
    if(input<min) min=input;
    std::cout<<"Enter the number: ";
}
std::cout<<"\nMax: "<<max<<"\nMin: "<<min;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Task does not assume that -1 is invalid input. Processing should stop by EOF, not by any particular value –  mvp Jul 19 at 18:26
    
@mvp Thanks, i have edited the program. –  user3834119 Jul 19 at 18:34

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