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I was searching for explanations over reference variables in c++ and I found this:

#include<iostream>
int a=10;   //global 'a' so that fun doesn't return a reference of its local variable
int & fun();
int main()
{
    int p = fun(); //line to be noted
    std::cout << p;
    return 0;
}

int & fun()
{
    return a;
}

This worked and so does this:

#include<iostream>
int a=10;   //global 'a' so that fun doesn't return a reference of its local variable
int & fun();
int main()
{
    int &p = fun(); //line to be noted
    std::cout << p;
    return 0;
}

int & fun()
{
    return a;
}

My question is how could an integer variable store the value of reference as is being done in first code snippet [line number 6]. Isn't the correct syntax as depicted in code snippet 2 [at line 6], i.e. we should define a reference variable (int &p) to carry the reference and not a regular integral variable? Shouldn't the compiler give an error or at least a warning? I am using GCC 4.7.1 64-bit.

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3  
It's copied. Just because you return a reference doesn't mean the user should be forced to use one. – chris Aug 17 '13 at 8:12
2  
Try changing a then re-printing p in both your examples. – Mat Aug 17 '13 at 8:13
3  
References are never values. The value of a reference variable or function return is just the referred object. – Kerrek SB Aug 17 '13 at 8:22
    
Unless and until you're not referring to the object, use receive the value of the object instead of reference. – Uchia Itachi Aug 17 '13 at 8:37
    
There is a difference between pointers and reference in C++. What you are returning is not an address but a reference to the global variable. – Kunal Aug 17 '13 at 12:09
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Okay got it ... @chris : you were right..When I did this:

int p = fun();
p++;
std::cout << p << endl << a;

It showed the results to be 11 and 10. Hence only a's value is copied into p and p doesn't became the alias of a. But when I tried the same with second code, it showed values of both a and p to be 11. Hence p became the alias of a.

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Yes, this is pretty much what I wrote, too. ;-) – lpapp Aug 17 '13 at 9:14
2  
The question that you asked and the answer that you understood are unrelated. – chosentorture Aug 17 '13 at 11:52

No, it is fine either way.

The return value reference is not even necessary in this special case because you are not trying to modify the return value "on the fly" or the 'a' later, like when you use arithmetic operator overloads for that purpose, for instance

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