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I'm trying a sample program to get the user mode of a file.

#! /usr/bin/perl 
use strict;
use warnings;
use File::stat;

my $file_name = 0;
my $info = 0;
my $ret_mode = 0;
foreach(@ARGV){
$file_name = $_;
$info = stat($file_name);
$ret_mode  = $info->mode;
print "Before : $ret_mode\n";
$ret_mode = $ret_mode & 0777;
print "After : $ret_mode\n";

if($ret_mode & 070){
 print "$file_name has Read,Write & Execute permission\n";
}
elsif($ret_mode & 060){
 print "$file_name has Read and write permission\n";
}
elsif($ret_mode & 050){
 print "$file_name has Read and execute permission\n";
}
elsif($ret_mode & 030){
 print "$file_name has Write and Execute permission\n";
}
elsif($ret_mode & 020){
 print "$file_name has Write permission\n";
}
elsif($ret_mode & 010){
 print "$file_name has Execute Permission\n";
}
elsif($ret_mode & 040){
 print "$file_name has Read Permission\n";
}
else{
 #nothing;
}
$ret_mode = 0;
}        

I tried a sample program to find the users permission of the files i'm giving as an arguments. I couldn't understand why $ret_mode has to and with 0777(group,user and owner) to get the mode value.
The above code doesnt give me the correct permission. Please help to understand what the $info->mode contain and why we need to and it with 0777.

EDITED:

OUPUT :

angus@ubuntu~/ perl 5.pl 1.pl 2.pl

Before : 32784
After : 16
1.pl has Read and execute permission
Before : 33188
After : 420

The i/p files 1.pl and 2.pl doesnt read , execute and write,execute permissions. The program above outputs a wrong reults.

ls -l

-----w---- 1 angus angus  174 2013-08-16 00:33 1.pl
-rw-r--r-- 1 angus angus  455 2013-08-16 08:33 1.txt
-rw-r--r-- 1 angus angus  245 2013-08-16 02:10 2.pl
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The 0777 trick is needed only if you want to display the result as a whole, not if you want to test it against masks. To see the difference, enter a directory or a soft link as an argument of the script.

If you are just testing whether the & operator returns anything, you should start from the most specific modes, i.e. reverse the logic. If a file only has the write permission, its mode is 020, but 020 & 070 is not zero:

    4 2 1
 ========
 7  1 1 1
 2  0 1 0
 --------
 &  0 1 0

Another option is to check the return value, i.e.

if (020 == ($ret_mode & 020)) {

To adhere to the DRY (Don't repeat yourself) principle, you may also shorten the code by using a hash:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

use File::stat;

my %name = ( 070 => 'Read,Write & Execute',
             060 => 'Read and write',
             050 => 'Read and execute',
             030 => 'Write and Execute',
             020 => 'Write',
             010 => 'Execute',
             040 => 'Read',
           );
my @modes = reverse(040, 010, 020, 030, 050, 060, 070);

for my $file_name (@ARGV) {
    my $info     = stat($file_name);
    my $ret_mode = $info->mode;
    printf "Before: %o\n", $ret_mode;
    $ret_mode &= 070;
    printf "After: %o\n", $ret_mode;
    for my $mode (@modes) {
        print "$file_name has $name{$mode} permission.\n" and last
            if ($ret_mode & $mode) == $mode;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good example with hashes . Thanks. –  Angus Aug 17 '13 at 15:17

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