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I wrote a simple test case:

$g = 10
def fun_g a
  a += $g
end

def fun_l a
  l = 10
  a += l
end

def fun_gl a
  $gl = 10
  a += $gl
end

def test fun
  t = Time.now

  (10 ** 6).times { |n|
    method(fun).call(n)
  }

  puts(Time.now - t)
end

test :fun_g
test :fun_l
test :fun_gl

The result is something like below. It seems that the first function fun_g is the fastest, and the fun_gl is the slowest.

1.249626
1.268355
1.30267

But I also get result that indicates the fun_l is the fastest.

1.27436
1.25794
1.303973

Theoretically, which one should be the fastest? What if I change the example to a compiled language, will the result still be the same? Will the compiler optimize the local variables to global ones?

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1  
All this benchmark measures is the performance of the garbage collector and the reflection system. Creating and destroying 1 million Method objects and reflectively calling them is orders of magnitude more expensive than a simple variable reference and a Fixnum addition. –  Jörg W Mittag Aug 17 '13 at 11:17
    
@JörgWMittag So that's why I ask for a theoretically explain, I know my test is not accurate. I present them here to show my though, nothing else. –  Yad Smood Aug 17 '13 at 11:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have converted this to use the STDLIB benchmark and got this result

require 'benchmark'

iterations = 10 ** 7
$global = 0
local = 0
@instance = 0
Benchmark.bmbm(8) do |x|
  x.report('global') {iterations.times { $global } }
  x.report('local') {iterations.times { local } }
  x.report('instance') {iterations.times { @instance  } }
end

The results:

Rehearsal --------------------------------------------
global     1.580000   0.010000   1.590000 (  1.600952)
local      1.540000   0.000000   1.540000 (  1.555683)
instance   1.600000   0.000000   1.600000 (  1.642781)
----------------------------------- total: 4.730000sec

               user     system      total        real
global     1.560000   0.000000   1.560000 (  1.575711)
local      1.540000   0.000000   1.540000 (  1.547040)
instance   1.600000   0.010000   1.610000 (  1.618772)

You had compared only local variable and global variables but neglected instance variables.

There is very negligible difference in any, which is actually a good thing.

I am not sure this answers your question, but hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
All this benchmark measures is the performance of the garbage collector and the reflection system. Creating and destroying 1 million Method objects and reflectively calling them is orders of magnitude more expensive than a simple variable reference and a Fixnum addition. –  Jörg W Mittag Aug 17 '13 at 11:17
    
Yes, I am sure that I agree with you. I actually am thinking that timing access of variables is a moot point. If it is more than negligible, then it is quite the real issue with a language. I have isolated the tests to the subject matter at hand... which is to say only accessing the global, local and instance variables. Thanks @JörgWMittag. –  vgoff Aug 17 '13 at 11:41
    
@JörgWMittag You are right. Why not teach me a right way to test it, or the theory behind it? –  Yad Smood Aug 17 '13 at 11:48
1  
See my current test @YadSmood it concentrates only on accessing those variables. –  vgoff Aug 17 '13 at 11:49

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