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I am trying to figure out the best way to use HTML::TreeBuilder in Perl to extract a few paragraphs of text from some HTML in a XML file.

I had it working using $tree->address (or so I thought) until I realized that not all entries are in the same order.

Without going though every single item in the list, it appears that each entry has several <div> elements, but only one of the <div>'s has <p> elements in it. And none of the <div>'s have classes, which would make this easy.

I have tried several different ways, and so for nothing seems to work in which I can extract the text in the that I want. I have looked at several different examples, but non of them really are close enough to what I am looking for.

It would be nice if something like this worked:

$bodyText = $tree->look_down( '_tag' => 'div' => 'p' );

But that gives me the error:

param list to look_down ends in a key!

Anyways, maybe someone can help point me in the right direction, I have been looking all night, and now my brain hurts.

Thanks!

John

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Could you add an example snippet of HTML? –  simbabque Aug 17 '13 at 12:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your error message makes sense. The look_down method expects a hash (which is a list of course). You are giving it three elements, so the last one is a key. Keep in mind that the => is also called fat comma and is just a more readable way to write a ,. It is a bit of an odd error message, though.

What you need to do is parse for <div>s first, and parse those for <p>s. You cannot do it in one go with HTML::TreeBuilder. You will get HTML::Element objects for each of the <div>s from the first foreach. Have them look_down for <p>s.

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw( say );
use HTML::TreeBuilder 5 -weak;

my $tree = HTML::TreeBuilder->new_from_content(<DATA>);
foreach my $e ($tree->look_down(_tag => 'div')) {
  foreach my $f ($e->look_down(_tag => 'p')) {
    say $f->as_text;
  }
}

__DATA__
<html>
<body>
<div>foo</div>
<div><p>hello world</p></div>
<div>foo2</div>
<div>foo3</div>
<div><p>hello again</p></div>
</body>
</html>
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With the vanilla form of HTML::TreeBuilder, this is best done using a code reference as a criterion of look_down. The subroutine will be called for each node in the tree that passes all previous criteria, and a node will be retained if the subroutine returns a true value.

This program shows its use. The anonymous subroutine uses grep to check the children of the node that is passed to it, counting all elements that have a p tag. The array @divs then contains all div elements that have a p child element. You may want to ensure that the @divs contains exactly one element.

use strict;
use warnings;

use feature 'say';

use HTML::TreeBuilder;

my $doc = HTML::TreeBuilder->new_from_content(<<__HTML__);
<div>content</div>
<div>content</div>
<div><p>paragraph</p></div>
<div>content</div>
<div>content</div>
__HTML__

my @divs = $doc->look_down(
  _tag => 'div', 
  sub { grep { ref eq 'HTML::Element' and  $_->tag eq 'p' } $_[0]->content_list }
);

say scalar @divs, " found:\n";
say $divs[0]->as_HTML('<>&', '  ');

output

1 found:

<div>
  <p>paragraph</div>

However, it is very much neater to employ the enhanced HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath, which allows the data to be addressed using XPath expressions. This allows look_down to be replaced with a findnodes call:

my @divs = $doc->findnodes('//div[p]');

and the result is identical to that of the code above.

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Trying your first example, I received the following error:Can't call method "isa" without a package or object reference at ... but 'm not sure why? –  John B Aug 17 '13 at 22:37
    
@JohnB: I apologize. I forgot you can't call isa on an empty string. I've fixed it. –  Borodin Aug 18 '13 at 7:46

I recommend to use XPath for this:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw( say );
use HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath;

my $tree = HTML::TreeBuilder->new_from_content(<DATA>);
foreach my $e ( $tree->findnodes('//div/p') ) {

    say $e->as_text;
}

__DATA__
<html>
<body>
<div>foo</div>
<div><p>hello world</p></div>
<div>foo2</div>
<div>foo3</div>
<div><p>hello again</p></div>
</body>
</html>
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use Web::Query 'wq';
print wq("<html><div><p>I'm trapped under a hat</p></div><div /><div /><div /><div /><div />")
        ->find('div p')->text;
share|improve this answer
    
Very neat. An explanation would be nice, though. ;-) –  simbabque Aug 17 '13 at 12:35

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