Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

WHYYYYYYY?

The following is about half of my code, as I've deleted most of it along with every hair I lost while trying to solve this. No matter what I remove or change, I keep getting a StackOverflowException.

Which is extremely odd because this exact same code worked earlier.

Please give me any advice at all because I'm clueless...

I've checked this and I don't think this is what happening:

  • Infinite recursive loop
  • Program simply runs out of stack space

­

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.IO;
using System.Net;

namespace ConsoleApplication10
{
class Program
{
    public int currentDialogueID = 0;

    List<NPC> NPCList = new List<NPC>() {
            new NPC(0, "Man", 1, true),
            new NPC(1, "Woman", 1, true),
            new NPC(2, "Troll", 3, true)
        };

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Program d = new Program();
        d.Init();
        Console.ReadKey(false);
    }

    void Init()
    {
        getNPCByName("Man").NPCDialogue();
    }

    public NPC getNPCByName(string npcName)
    {
        IEnumerable<NPC> myNPCsName = from nn in NPCList
                                      where nn._name.ToLower() == npcName.ToLower()
                                      orderby nn._name ascending
                                      select nn;

        foreach(NPC nn2 in myNPCsName)
        {
            return nn2;
        }

        return null;
    }

    public NPC getNPCByID(int npcID)
    {
        IEnumerable<NPC> NPCsByID = from ni in NPCList
                                    where ni._npcID == npcID
                                    orderby ni._npcID ascending
                                    select ni;

        foreach(NPC ni2 in NPCsByID)
        {
            return ni2;
        }

        return null;
    }

    public string getNPCNameByID(int npcid)
    {
        return getNPCByID(npcid)._name;
    }
}

class NPC : Program
{
    public string _name = "null";
    public int _level;
    public int _npcID;
    public int _maxDamage;
    public bool _canFight = false;

    public NPC(int npcID = 0, string name = "null", int level = 0, bool canSpeak = false, bool canFight = false, int maxDamage = 0)
    {
        _level = level;
        _name = name;
        _npcID = npcID;
        _canFight = canFight;
        _maxDamage = maxDamage;
    }

    public void NPCDialogue()
    {
        currentDialogueID = _npcID;
        switch(_npcID)
        {
            case 0:
            NPCSpeak("Man test... ... ...");
            break;

            case 1:
            NPCSpeak("Woman test");
            break;

            case 2:
            NPCSpeak("I'm Elad the Troll, Ramzes your ear is that of an elf");
            break;

            default:
            return;
        }
    }

    public void NPCSpeak(string text, int npcID = 99999)
    {
        if(npcID == 99999)
            npcID = currentDialogueID;
        if(npcID != 99999)
            type(getNPCNameByID(npcID) + ": " + text);
    }

    public void type(string x)
    {
        Random rnd = new Random();
        char[] xx = x.ToCharArray();
        for(int i = 0; i < xx.Length; i++)
        {
            Console.Write(xx[i]);
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(rnd.Next(10, 120));
            if(xx[i] == ':' || (xx[i] == '.' && xx[i - 1] != '.' && xx[i + 1] != '.') || xx[i] == '!' || xx[i] == '\n' || xx[i] == '?')
            {
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(rnd.Next(400, 1500));
            }
        }
    }
}

class Item : Program
{
    public string _name = "null";
    public string _description = "How did you get this?";
    public bool _isWeapon = false;
    public int _maxDamage;
    public int _itemID = 0;

    public Item(int itemID = 0, string name = "null", string description = "null", bool isWeapon = false, int maxDamage = 0)
    {
        _itemID = itemID;
        _name = name;
        _description = description;
        _isWeapon = isWeapon;
        _maxDamage = maxDamage;
    }
}
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Looks like you're a little confused about what classes should be inherited where.

Your program class creates a new list of 3 NPCs. NPC inherits from Program, which means (basically) that all the code from program is dropped into NPC. What this means here is that since Program creates a list of 3 NPCs when it's instantiated, NPC inherits this code and creates an additional list of 3 more NPCs, each of which inherits from program and create 3 more NPCs each, etc. until the stack overflows.

The tip about looking at the call stack to catch this stuff is good advice. I'd also just add that inheritance is generally used slightly differently. Just because NPC and Item are used by your Program doesn't mean they have to (or should) inherit it. Inheritance is best used between classes where one is a subset of the other, but has more specific characteristics. A general example is that a class Animal with properties 'Family, Species, Age' etc. might be inherited by class Dog which also has all those properties, but you might also want to use the Dog-specific property 'Breed' as well.

In your case NPC might be a parent class that is inherited by "Merchant" or "Companion", both of which are still NPCs (and therefore should have all the basic NPC characteristics) but might also have different behavior specific to their subclass. Item might be inherited by "Weapon" and "Shield", which are both items but have different additional characteristics to keep track of.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, very in-depth explanation, thank you very much! I just wanted to let them inherit because I wanted to use all the variables and functions across the classes... But I just made a separate class containing all the variables I need, and made a static instance of that to access it everywhere. I don't even know if that's the best way, but oh well... –  Adam Aug 18 '13 at 21:11
    
I don't know much a lot about how games are typically programmed, but it doesn't sound like it's particularly bad practice to have some sort of GameState type class which holds important game variables that other classes need to access, depending on what you store there. It's good object oriented practice to store relevent data in the class it's most related to though, so if you had an "Inventory" collection, you'd probably want to store it in the NPC or Player class, rather than in the GameState class. –  UpQuark Aug 19 '13 at 13:17

You have NPC that is a Program, but each Program has a List of 3 NPC... You see?

The next time, you look at the Call Stack window and you'll see

ConsoleApplication5.exe!ConsoleApplication10.Program.Program() Line 13 + 0xffffffe6 bytes   C#
ConsoleApplication5.exe!ConsoleApplication10.NPC.NPC(int npcID, string name, int level, bool canSpeak, bool canFight, int maxDamage) Line 77 + 0x8 bytes    C#
ConsoleApplication5.exe!ConsoleApplication10.Program.Program() Line 15 + 0x40 bytes C#
ConsoleApplication5.exe!ConsoleApplication10.NPC.NPC(int npcID, string name, int level, bool canSpeak, bool canFight, int maxDamage) Line 77 + 0x8 bytes    C#
ConsoleApplication5.exe!ConsoleApplication10.Program.Program() Line 15 + 0x40 bytes C#
ConsoleApplication5.exe!ConsoleApplication10.NPC.NPC(int npcID, string name, int level, bool canSpeak, bool canFight, int maxDamage) Line 77 + 0x8 bytes    C#
ConsoleApplication5.exe!ConsoleApplication10.Program.Program() Line 15 + 0x40 bytes C#
ConsoleApplication5.exe!ConsoleApplication10.NPC.NPC(int npcID, string name, int level, bool canSpeak, bool canFight, int maxDamage) Line 77 + 0x8 bytes    C#
ConsoleApplication5.exe!ConsoleApplication10.Program.Program() Line 15 + 0x40 bytes C#

then you can click on the lines and see where the next step was initiated.

share|improve this answer
    
The whole program gets run again when I run the NPC class? ... –  Adam Aug 17 '13 at 12:55
    
No, the whole class is instantiated again. A class isn't a program, even if you call it Program. –  xanatos Aug 17 '13 at 12:56
    
Alright then.. Didn't know that.. Well, thank you very much! –  Adam Aug 17 '13 at 12:58
1  
Program is your console app, dont inherit from your console app ..create separate clases –  Robert Aug 17 '13 at 13:02
Program d = new Program();

You have to remove this line, you are calling program constructor every time you run the program constructor, causing the stackoverflow

share|improve this answer
1  
No, it isn't. Look better. Main is static –  xanatos Aug 17 '13 at 12:54
    
No, that's been there since the beginning. It only gets called once with the Main function, after that not anymore. And I need it because Main is static.. –  Adam Aug 17 '13 at 12:54
    
doesn't new program() get called automatically when you launch the application anyways, seems like you would be instantiating a program inside a program here, which could eventually go recursive like @Xikinho90 pointed out –  Robert Aug 17 '13 at 12:58
    
Your answer does not state what is so bad about Program's constructor being called. Since the OP has not provided a constructor, the implicit implementation likely doesn't do anything at all... at least nothing that would cause the stack overflow (such as calling static void Main). –  stakx Aug 17 '13 at 13:01
    
@Robert Main only gets called once, so it doesn't loop after Program is instantiated the first time –  Adam Aug 17 '13 at 13:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.