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I created a basic program where user input is turned into an alert on submission. I can't figure out why the program only works as intended if I use false rather than true as the first condition in my if/else statement. I'm sure this is very basic but I've failed to find anything of relevance. After a long search I decided to post the question. Any answers will be greatly appreciated.

The HTML:

<form id="greetingForm"> 
<input type="text" name="userInput" id="userInput"/>
<input type="submit" value="click" id="submit"/>
</form>

The broken script:

function output(){
var input = document.getElementById('userInput').value;   

    if(input == true){
    alert(input);
    }else{
    alert('Say something!');
    }

}

function init(){
var greetingForm = document.getElementById('greetingForm');
greetingForm.onsubmit = output;
}

window.onload = init;

The working script:

function output(){
var input = document.getElementById('userInput').value;   

    if(input == false){
    alert('Say something!');
    }else{
    alert(input);
    }

}

function init(){
var greetingForm = document.getElementById('greetingForm');
greetingForm.onsubmit = output;
}

window.onload = init;
share|improve this question
    
Maybe input is neither true nor false? Is it a string? (Try using some developer tools and watch/play with the value of input) –  lc. Aug 17 '13 at 14:46
    
Move to using === or !== against "" –  Paul S. Aug 17 '13 at 14:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To clarify ferd tomale's answer, it's one of the "weird" type conversion cases where a check on equality to true does not behave in the same way as check on equality to false.

"" == false -> true
"a" == false -> false, but
"" == true -> false
"a" == true -> false

You can switch to using typesafe comparison operators (===, !==), which behave much more predictable, but then you'll have to convert values to the correct type yourself. Or you can learn the quirks of JS's automatic type conversion when you use == or !=.

share|improve this answer
    
And the source of all weirdness is detailed here: ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-11.9.3 –  bfavaretto Aug 17 '13 at 15:20

The variable input will never be equal to the boolean true because it is a string. Try changing it to:

function output(){
  var input = document.getElementById('userInput').value;
  if(input != ""){
    alert(input);
  }else{
    alert('Say something!');
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Prior to receiving this answer, I worked around it by using the length property of the string. function output(){ var input = document.getElementById('userInput').value; if(input.length >= 1){ alert(input); }else{ alert('Say something!'); } } –  Liam89 Aug 17 '13 at 15:09

Because your input is a string. And string == true will be false.

You can set breakpoints to check them.

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