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I have a struct defined as:

struct smth
{
    char a;
    int b[];
};

When I call sizeof and offsetof on this struct:

cout << sizeof(struct smth) << endl;
cout << offsetof(struct smth, b) << endl;

Output is:

4
4

How come when the size of the stuct is 4 and char is using 1 byte, the offset of the int array is 4? Why is there some kind of padding? Also, why isn't the int array occupying any space at all?

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1  
You mean offsetof(struct smth, b), right? –  Carl Norum Aug 17 '13 at 15:17
    
@CarlNorum Yes, I do. Edited. –  bugra Aug 17 '13 at 15:19
2  
Is it C or C++? They are different. –  Yu Hao Aug 17 '13 at 15:20
    
@YuHao I am asking specifically for C++ but added c tag so people can find it with that tag as well. How are they different w.r.t. the answer of this question? –  bugra Aug 17 '13 at 15:24
3  
@biox6 You should tag the question with only the tag that's relative. C and C++ may be similar in many fields, they are different in more. In this question, e.g, variable length arrays are only valid in C, not C++. –  Yu Hao Aug 17 '13 at 15:27
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

How come when the size of the stuct is 4 and char is using 1 byte, the offset of the int array is 4? Why is there some kind of padding?

There is padding because the C standard allows it; the compiler often aligns variables to improve performance.

Also, why isn't the second variable occupying any space at all (which seems like the case)?

It's a C99 flexible array member - that's the entire point of it. The idea is to allocate your structure something like:

struct smth *s = malloc(sizeof *s + 10 * sizeof s->b[0]);

And then you'd have a structure that operates as if b were a 10-element array.

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What kind of performance improvements does this allow? Just curious. –  bugra Aug 17 '13 at 15:22
    
@biox6, some processors load instructions can only load words from word-aligned addresses. If you have a word at an unaligned address, you'd need to load each byte separately and recombine. –  Carl Norum Aug 17 '13 at 15:23
    
Your allocation statement does not consider alignment constraints. In general it will fail to allocate the correct amount of memory. You would instead allocate a properly sized structure using struct smth *s = malloc(offsetof(struct smth, b[10]));. –  IInspectable Aug 17 '13 at 15:48
    
@IInspectable, how so? malloc is required to return safely-aligned pointers, and the structure is laid out correctly. What's the difference? –  Carl Norum Aug 17 '13 at 16:27
1  
probably 10 * sizeof s->b[0] –  6502 Aug 17 '13 at 18:06
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Because the size of the member b is zero, and the compiler adds padding between the a and b members so that b is on a "word" boundary.

However, if I remember correctly having a flexible array in a structure like that is only valid C, not C++ except as a compiler extension.

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here is this int b[] equivalent to int *b? –  Light Aug 17 '13 at 15:35
2  
No it is not. int* b would make the sizeof(smth) larger, and the extra space would be where address of some int variable is to be stored. Instead, int b[] says the structure shall be allocated dynamically with some (unknown at compile time) number of integers as a single memory block. –  mity Aug 17 '13 at 15:40
    
@mity How do you assign value(s) to the variable b,could you give me the assignment statement –  Light Aug 17 '13 at 15:56
    
@Light See the answer from Carl Norum. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 17 '13 at 15:57
    
@Light: Given struct smth *s = malloc(sizeof(*s) + 10*sizeof(*s->b));, you can write s->a = 'c'; s->b[0] = 0; s->b[9] = 9;, etc. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 17 '13 at 15:58
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Since OP comments that the question is C++:

struct smth
{
    char a;
    int b[];
};

An array like b[] is invalid in C++. The array must have fixed size. Variable length arrays are only valid in C99.

Assuming that your compiler supports it as extension, the array b[] has a size of zero, which makes the struct containing only a char member. The the rule of padding in struct works, padding the struct to a word, which is 4 bytes in your machine.

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