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Is this

struct Example { 
    int a, b; 
    Example(int mA, int mB) : a{mA}, b{mB}               { }
    Example(const Example& mE) : a{mE.a}, b{mE.b}        { }
    Example(Example&& mE) : a{move(mE.a)}, b{move(mE.b)} { }
    Example& operator=(const Example& mE) { a = mE.a; b = mE.b; return *this; } 
    Example& operator=(Example&& mE)      { a = move(mE.a); b = move(mE.b); return *this; } 
}

equivalent to this

struct Example { 
    int a, b; 
    Example(int mA, int mB) : a{mA}, b{mB} { }
    Example(const Example& mE)            = default;
    Example(Example&& mE)                 = default;
    Example& operator=(const Example& mE) = default;
    Example& operator=(Example&& mE)      = default;
}

?

share|improve this question
    
This might be a duplication of stackoverflow.com/questions/4819936/… – Dieter Lücking Aug 17 '13 at 15:55
1  
@DieterLücking: It's clearly not, though it's on a similar topic and some answers may cover similar ground. However, we shall not close every single question about move semantics as duplicates of each other. – PreferenceBean Aug 18 '13 at 1:45
    
I added an answer because I was looking for this myself and the provided answers did not provide enough details to confirm this was actually the case. – Shafik Yaghmour Aug 4 '14 at 17:03
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Yes both are the same.

But

struct Example { 
    int a, b; 
    Example(int mA, int mB) : a{mA}, b{mB} { }
    Example(const Example& mE)            = default;
    Example(Example&& mE)                 = default;
    Example& operator=(const Example& mE) = default;
    Example& operator=(Example&& mE)      = default;
}

This version will permits you to skip the body definition.

However, you have to follow some rules when you declare explicitly-defaulted-functions :

8.4.2 Explicitly-defaulted functions [dcl.fct.def.default]

A function definition of the form:

  attribute-specifier-seqopt decl-specifier-seqopt declarator virt-specifier-seqopt = default ;

is called an explicitly-defaulted definition. A function that is explicitly defaulted shall

  • be a special member function,

  • have the same declared function type (except for possibly differing ref-qualifiers and except that in the case of a copy constructor or copy assignment operator, the parameter type may be “reference to non-const T”, where T is the name of the member function’s class) as if it had been implicitly declared,

  • not have default arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
What document are you quoting 8.4.2 from? Neither the C++11 standard or N3690 contain the text ", and not have an exception-specification" in 8.4.2/1. They do both say in 8.4.2/2: "An explicitly-defaulted function may be declared constexpr only if it would have been implicitly declared as constexpr, and may have an explicit exception-specification only if it is compatible (15.4) with the exception-specification on the implicit declaration." – Casey Aug 17 '13 at 22:45
    
@Casey Good catch ! I was quoting the N3242... I mixed up my docs... I updated my post to quote the N3690 ! Thank you for pointing this out ! – Pierre Fourgeaud Aug 17 '13 at 22:55
1  
If I set a move constructor and assignment operator to = default, will I be able to swap with the object? Don't I need to declare the constructor as noexcept? I tried putting both noexcept and =default for both, but this would not compile. – VF1 Aug 23 '13 at 19:21

Yes, a defaulted move constructor will perform a member-wise move of its base and members, so:

Example(Example&& mE) : a{move(mE.a)}, b{move(mE.b)} { }

is equivalent to:

Example(Example&& mE)                 = default;

we can see this by going to the draft C++11 standard section 12.8 Copying and moving class objects paragraph 13 which says (emphasis mine going forward):

A copy/move constructor that is defaulted and not defined as deleted is implicitly defined if it is odrused (3.2) or when it is explicitly defaulted after its first declaration. [ Note: The copy/move constructor is implicitly defined even if the implementation elided its odr-use (3.2, 12.2). —end note ][...]

and paragraph 15 which says:

The implicitly-defined copy/move constructor for a non-union class X performs a memberwise copy/move of its bases and members. [ Note: brace-or-equal-initializers of non-static data members are ignored. See also the example in 12.6.2. —end note ] The order of initialization is the same as the order of initialization of bases and members in a user-defined constructor (see 12.6.2). Let x be either the parameter of the constructor or, for the move constructor, an xvalue referring to the parameter. Each base or non-static data member is copied/moved in the manner appropriate to its type:

  • if the member is an array, each element is direct-initialized with the corresponding subobject of x;
  • if a member m has rvalue reference type T&&, it is direct-initialized with static_cast(x.m);
  • otherwise, the base or member is direct-initialized with the corresponding base or member of x.

Virtual base class subobjects shall be initialized only once by the implicitly-defined copy/move constructor (see 12.6.2).

share|improve this answer

apart very pathological cases ... YES.

To be more precise, you have also to considered eventual bases Example may have, with exact same rules. First the bases -in declaration order- then the members, always in declaration order.

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