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Suppose we define a function that simply increments its input by some stored value dd:

var obj={}
obj.dd=1
obj.f=function(x){
    return x+this.dd
}

Alternatively you could create a closure for dd as follows but this would create a static increment as opposed to one that could be altered later:

var dd=1
var f=function(x){
    return x+dd
}

We could alternatively store dd in the function itself:

var obj={}
obj.f=function(x){
    return x+this.f.dd
}
obj.f.dd=1

I am curious as to whether it is possible for a function to retrieve a variable attached to itself without going through a parent object, something like a self keyword that would refer to the function itself and would allow the following:

var f=function(x){
    return x+self.dd
}
f.dd=1

I know it is unnecessary to do such a thing but I think it would be cool if you could.

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1  
Other answers already cover whether this is technically feasible or not. However, I would highly recommend keeping it simple and using regular features to do the same thing (this / closures). Not only will it be more familiar for most people but mutating function attributes will disable many compiler optimizations. –  hugomg Aug 17 '13 at 17:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can give function literals a name:

var f = function me(x) {
    return x + me.dd;
};

f.dd = 1;

This doesn’t work properly in older versions of IE/JScript, though, as me and f don’t reference the same object. The (deprecated and not usable in strict mode) alternative is arguments.callee:

var f = function(x) {
    return x + arguments.callee.dd;
};

f.dd = 1;

Also, your note about the closure isn’t quite right; it can be altered later, even through another function:

var dd = 1;
var f = function(x) {
    return x + dd;
};

var setdd = function(_dd) {
    dd = _dd;
};
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Thank you for your response. So I take it that there is simply no way to create an anonymous function that exhibits this behavior? –  gloo Aug 17 '13 at 17:24
    
I have question on stackover etiquette. I realize now that fumbled my question and I meant to ask if such a behavior is possible in an anonymous function. Should I post a new question or edit the existing one? –  gloo Aug 17 '13 at 17:31
    
@gloo: You can edit your question. Anyways, yes, you can, using arguments.callee; but what’s the point of an “anonymous function”? You can use a named function literal anywhere you can use an anonymous function literal. The only caveat is IE 8-, and argument.callee has worked since IE3 or something, so no worries there. –  minitech Aug 17 '13 at 17:32
    
I agree there is no reason to do this. I was just curious if it were possible. I will definitely check out argument.callee. –  gloo Aug 18 '13 at 14:33

A function is an object. If you reference the var holding the function:

var f = function (x) {
    return x + f.dd
};

f.dd = 1;

alert(f(1));

result: 2

If the function is named, you can do the same:

function foo(x) {
    return x + foo.dd;
}

foo.dd = 1;
alert(foo(1));

result: 2

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