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I have a script that should read in a user-specified 2-column csv file located in the same directory, do some maths on the data, and print the results out to stdout which is another user-defined csv file. I made it in 2.7.5 but now having just finally moved over to 3.2, it doesn't work. Not a shock I know but I'm pretty inexperienced in programming and I'm having trouble working out how to make it work in Python 3.

I've stripped back the code to its basic reading and printing elements that used to work and it still isn't working in 3.2 despite doing some of the more obvious modifications, it just gets stuck and never prints to the new file. I have tried using 2to3.py but it throws up a bad input parseerror and no changes are made! I'd rather learn exactly why it now doesn't work anyway.

The type of command I want is;

somedirectory>myscript inputdata.csv > outputdata.csv

Here's a stripped-back version of the Python 2.7.5 script that worked so you can see what i am doing, (I have left in all the imports)

import fileinput, math, sys, numpy as np
from numpy import linspace, loadtxt, ones, convolve
from optparse import OptionParser

def main():
    parser = OptionParser() 
    options,args = parser.parse_args()
    try:
        data = [(line.rstrip()).split(',') for line in fileinput.input(args)]
    except IOError as detail:
        print >> sys.stderr, detail
        sys.exit(2)

    '''kept these lines in just to make sure the data is in the same format as when it worked before'''
    t = [float(row[0]) for row in data]
    m = [float(row[1]) for row in data]
    result = [[a,b] for a,b in zip(t, m)]

    for line in result:
        print >> sys.stdout, str(line[0]) + ',' + str(line[1])

options = 0
if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

Obviously Print is now a function, deprecated Optparse can be converted over to Argparse etc

so I thought something like this would be fine,

import fileinput, math, sys, inspect, numpy as np
from numpy import linspace, loadtxt, ones, convolve
from argparse import ArgumentParser

def main():
    parser = ArgumentParser()   
    options,args = parser.parse_args()
    try:
        data = [(line.rstrip()).split(',') for line in fileinput.input(args)]
    except IOError as detail:
        print(detail, file=sys.stderr)
        sys.exit(2)

    '''kept these lines in just to make sure the data is in the same format as when it worked before'''
    t = [float(row[0]) for row in data]
    m = [float(row[1]) for row in data]
    result = [[a,b] for a,b in zip(t, m)]

    for line in result:
        print(str(line[0]) + ',' + str(line[1]), file=sys.stdout)

options = 0
if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

There are probably some glaring issues with this but after researching all the elements I'm stuck on where exactly it's breaking.

Additionally there are probably better ways of doing this type of csv-file reading and writing, i just stuck with this as I know it did work. I know about the csv module for example, but i cannot find any examples of using it on user-specified files from command line like how i need it, all the examples I can find define the file to be opened in the script itself.

Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A few things before the code. If you use the argparse module you, you have to specify that it has to receive a filename as input. This is what I did with the add_argument. Since the argument is not optional the application will exit if the user does not specify the filename.

If the user specified the filename I try to open it and create a csv reader. csv reader is just an iterator that parsed the file so I can iterate through every row, which I do and populate the resulting list. When the list is populated the application iterates through the list printing out all the elements. try/except is there incase anything went wrong.

import io
import csv
import argparse

def main():
    # Create the parser
    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
    parser.add_argument('filename', help='Name of the file you want to load')
    args = parser.parse_args()

    result = []
    with io.open(args.filename, 'r', encoding='utf-8') as f:
        reader = csv.reader(f)
        for row in reader:
            result.append([row[0], row[1]])

    for item in result:
        print('{0}, {1}'.format(*item))

if __name__ == "__main__":
    try:
        main()
    except Exception as e:
        print('Something went wrong {0}'.format(e))
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, that looks a lot more like how it should be done! However i can't seem to get this code to work. If I don't use argparse and change the object in the io.open() to a specific filename this runs fine, but when I use as above I get "error: to few arguments" when using a command in command line in the format i gave above. It should work as it is the same format as the usage states. In fact no matter how i try it it doesn't seem to recognise any input file I call. How should you call the input file in command for this? –  kodasik Aug 18 '13 at 8:18
    
You don't have to change anything just save it to myscript.py and call it as you stated in you question: python myscript.py inputdata.csv > outputdata.csv –  Viktor Kerkez Aug 18 '13 at 12:22
    
Thank you, after some playing about I just found this out too. That's not exactly the command I stated. With the old code I would change directory to the location of my script and csv's, CD C:\somedirectory, and type the command myscript inputdata.csv > outputdata.csv. Now i need to specify "python" and the extension of the python script, not exactly what i was looking for but at least it now works! –  kodasik Aug 18 '13 at 12:52
    
Are you on linux or windows? –  Viktor Kerkez Aug 18 '13 at 13:08
    
I'm using windows 7 –  kodasik Aug 18 '13 at 13:18

This main works, just changing the print:

def main():
    parser = OptionParser()
    options,args = parser.parse_args()
    try:
        data = [(line.rstrip()).split(',') for line in fileinput.input(args)]
    except IOError as detail:
        print(detail, file=sys.stderr)
        sys.exit(2)

    '''kept these lines in just to make sure the data is in the same format as when it worked before'''
    t = [float(row[0]) for row in data]
    m = [float(row[1]) for row in data]
    result = [[a,b] for a,b in zip(t, m)]

    for line in result:
        print(', '.join(str(x) for x in line), file=sys.stdout)

The reason you don't get anything from the 2nd version is the indent on sys.exit(2)

except IOError as detail:
    print(detail, file=sys.stderr)
sys.exit(2)

It exits without moving on to the normal output

With corrections to argparse (allowing 1 or more input files):

def main():
    parser = ArgumentParser()
    parser.add_argument('infiles',nargs='+')
    args = parser.parse_args()
    try:
        data = [(line.rstrip()).split(',') for line in fileinput.input(args.infiles)]
    except IOError as detail:
        print(detail, file=sys.stderr)
        sys.exit(2)

    '''kept these lines in just to make sure the data is in the same format as when it worked before'''
    t = [float(row[0]) for row in data]
    m = [float(row[1]) for row in data]
    result = [[a,b] for a,b in zip(t, m)]

    for line in result:
        print(', '.join(str(x) for x in line))

Or you can let argparse take care of opening the file(s) (and raising an error if needed):

import argparse
def main():
    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
    parser.add_argument('infiles',nargs='+', type=argparse.FileType('r'))
    args = parser.parse_args()
    data = [row for file in args.infile for row in csv.reader(file)]

    '''kept these lines in just to make sure the data is in the same format as when it worked before'''
    t = [float(row[0]) for row in data]
    m = [float(row[1]) for row in data]
    result = [[a,b] for a,b in zip(t, m)]

    for line in result:
        print(', '.join(str(x) for x in line))

FileType also recognizes '-' as stdin (or for a ('w') file, stdout)

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, with sys.exit(2) this is just an error in formatting in my question, it is correct in the actual script I ran. Thanks for the answer though as per my reply to Victor these still don't seem to work, likely something wrong my end! If i use the first version of main() the script just hangs and doesn't exit. If i use the second I get the same "error:too few arguments" as with Victor's answer (the issues here must be something to do with argparse). With the third bizarrely I get "NameError: global name 'argparse' is not defined"! –  kodasik Aug 18 '13 at 8:42
    
global name 'argparse' is not defined just means that argparse was not imported. I switched to argparse.ArgumentParser because I was also using argparse.FileType. –  hpaulj Aug 24 '13 at 2:09
    
Sometimes I add print sys.argv to see the strings that argparse works with. Normally that should be ['scriptname.py','arg1','arg2',...]. argparse` uses sys.argv[1:], everything but that 1st one. sys.argv[0] is used as the default prog value (in the usage message). –  hpaulj Aug 24 '13 at 2:14

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