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I have a question on copy construction in Java. Consider the following class;

In the copy constructor I can say new(Integer(other.id)) to get a new integer object being passed to the constructor, but I can't say new T(other.data) as the compiler will say cannot instantiate the type T. How can I make sure that when the generic item is copy constructed that it will not just pass a reference such that the 2 objects will share the underlying data.

Also, in the getLinks method it is doing a new and creating a new object of the list but is that going to deep copy and create new object of the items contained in the list or will it just contain references to the existing objects list items such that you have 2 lists both pointing to the same data. See below the comments / code. Thanks in advance for your expertise.

class DigraphNode<T>  
{
    Integer id;
    T data;
    ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> > links;

    public DigraphNode(Integer i) 
    {
        id = i; 
        links = new ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> >();
    }
    public DigraphNode(Integer i, T d) 
    { 
        id = i; data = d; 
        links = new ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> >();
    }

    public DigraphNode(DigraphNode<T> other)
    {
        other.id = new Integer(other.id);
        other.data = other.data; // line in question
        this.links=other.getLinks(); // also will create a new list with references
                                     // or will it deep copy the items contained in the list?
                                     // see getLinks() method below
    }

    public void setData (T d ) { data =  d; }
    public void addLink (DigraphNode<T> n) { links.add(n); }
    public void addLinks (ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> > ns) { links.addAll(ns); }

    public ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> > getLinks()
    {
        return new ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> >(links); 
    }

    public void printNode()
    {
        System.out.print("Id: " + id + " links: ");
        for ( DigraphNode<T> i : links )
        {
            System.out.print(i.id + " ");
        }
        System.out.println();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
try to ask one question per question – aaronman Aug 17 '13 at 23:23
    
they are all related to the same class and all with the constructor so I didn't see any issue with lumping them together. I made separate paragraphs to help delineate. Although will consider/take your advice on future posts. Thanks. – bjackfly Aug 17 '13 at 23:25
1  
Just trying to help you get an answer, people won't be as inclined to read through your wall of text if they don't think it's an interesting question, best to keep simple questions short – aaronman Aug 17 '13 at 23:28
    
Makes sense. Thanks for the tip will use it going forward. – bjackfly Aug 17 '13 at 23:29
    
@aaronman is very right. People on SO are usually hunting for reputation or out of boredom. When you post a wordy question it discourages people. – William Morrison Aug 17 '13 at 23:32
up vote 1 down vote accepted

  1. You can't instantiate new T(other.data) as you tried, but you can clone() other.data if T implements Cloneable
  2. Every call to getLinks() will create a new list with reference to object contained to links, you have to different lists with same reference inside (so change one reference object property will reflect to other list object because they are the same object)
  3. About ArrayList<> links = new ArrayList<>(); from Oracle doc:

    Initializer blocks for instance variables look just like static initializer blocks, but without the static keyword:
    {
    // whatever code is needed for initialization goes here
    }
    The Java compiler copies initializer blocks into every constructor. Therefore, this approach can be used to share a block of code between multiple constructors.

EDIT:
You can define a static method (copy) that try to use all possible strategies to copy generic object; the best approch is to define your own interface to separate your own stategy and simulate a sort of copy-constructor (you can reuse copy method if you want), else via serialization or, as last try, using cloning (but clone() is full of pitfall).
You can also use this libraries:


interface MyCloneableInterface<T> {
  T duplicate(T object) throws CopyException;
}
public static <T> T copy(T data) throws CopyException  {
  if(data == null) return null;
  if(data instanceof MyCloneableInterface) {
    return ((MyCloneabeInterface)data).duplicate(data);
  }
  if(data instanceof Serializable) {
    try {
      ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
      ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(baos);
      oos.writeObject(this);

      ByteArrayInputStream bais = new ByteArrayInputStream(baos.toByteArray());
      ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(bais);
      return (CloneExample) ois.readObject();
    }
    catch(...) {//rethrow}
  }
  if(data instanceof Cloneable) {
    try {
      return (T)data.clone();
    }
    catch(CloneNotSupportedException e) {//rethrow}
  }
  // else you can look for copy-constructor via reflection or
  // cloning object field-by-field via reflection...
}
share|improve this answer
    
You can clone other.data if the class happens to support cloning. – Don Roby Aug 17 '13 at 23:40
    
thanks for the update bellabax this is helpful – bjackfly Aug 21 '13 at 7:12

First Question: You cannot instantiate a generic instance (in other words call T's constructor). You should either define T implements Cloneable and call clone or use another interface of your own if T is always under your control. There are many pitfalls to this method, I'd suggest you first read about this interface and familiarize yourself with the pitfalls (you can find a great chapter on this, in "Effective Java" book). Also, it is not always that you can guarantee that this class will use T types which are Cloneable.

About links - you're instantiating it in the beginning and then override it in the constructor - Why? Remove the initialization. The way your getLinks works is not by creating a deep copy. Meaning - you'll get a new list, the list itself will be different from the original list, but the items will be shallow copies.

About your last question - as I already said, it's redundant. Remove the initialization at the beginning. You're creating an object, never use it and leave it for garbage collection. What you can do to avoid calling this in every constructor is something like this:

public DigraphNode() {
    links = new ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> >();
}

And have other constructors call this constructor, for example:

public DigraphNode(T val) {
    this();
    this.data = val;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I only override links in the copy constructor. In the regular constructors I don't override it. Although point is taken I have changed the copy constructor to not instantiate but just copy the data members to avoid the scenario you mentioned and will just move initialization to the constructor or an initializer block as @bellabax mentioned below – bjackfly Aug 17 '13 at 23:47
    
Anyway I think it's good practice to avoid creating unused object and use calls to a base constructor. Maybe my example should have been different because usually you have a specific constructor and other, more general constructors, call the specific constructor. – Avi Aug 17 '13 at 23:49
    
Thanks this makes sense I updated my comment. – bjackfly Aug 17 '13 at 23:50

Upvoted all helpful answers, but I am answering my own question below which shows the updated code. I wanted to see how someone would implement a copy for a generic but no one posted code for that so I rolled my own. See below my answer.

import java.lang.reflect.*;
import java.util.*;

class MissingDigraphNodeException extends Exception 
{
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1000L;
    public MissingDigraphNodeException(String message)
    {
        super(message);
    }
}

class CopyException extends Exception 
{
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 2000L;
    public CopyException(String message)
    {
        super(message);
    }
}

class DigraphNode<T>  
{
    Integer id;
    T data;
    ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> > links;

    public DigraphNode(Integer i) 
    {
        id = i; 
        links = new ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> >();
    }
    public DigraphNode(Integer i, T d) 
    { 
        id = i; data = d; 
        links = new ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> >();
    }

    public DigraphNode(DigraphNode<T> other)
    {
        try
        {
            this.data = copy(other.data);
        }
        catch (CopyException e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        this.links=other.getLinks();
        this.id = new Integer(other.id);
    }

    // is there a better way to copy a generic?
    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public T copy( T source ) throws CopyException
    {
        Class<?> clzz = source.getClass();
        Method meth;
        Object dupl = null;
        try {
            meth = clzz.getMethod("clone", new Class[0]);
            dupl = meth.invoke(source, new Object[0]);
        } catch (Exception e) 
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
            throw new CopyException("Error: Copying Generic of T");
        }   
        return (T) dupl;
    }

    public void setData (T d ) { data =  d; }
    public void addLink (DigraphNode<T> n) { links.add(n); }
    public void addLinks (ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> > ns) { links.addAll(ns); }

    public ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> > getLinks()
    {
        // return a new copy of the list
        ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> > l = new ArrayList<DigraphNode<T> >(); 
        for ( DigraphNode<T> i : links )
        {
            i.links.add(new DigraphNode<T>(i)); // use copy constructor
        }
        return l;
    }

    public void printNode()
    {
        System.out.print("Id: " + id + " links: ");
        for ( DigraphNode<T> i : links )
        {
            System.out.print(i.id + " ");
        }
        System.out.println();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
read my edit if can be helpful – Luca Basso Ricci Aug 18 '13 at 14:47
    
I think that instead of your copy implementation you should do something like this: if (source instanceof Cloneable) { T dupl = (T) ((Cloneable) source).clone()); } If source is not an instance of Cloneable than most probably calling its clone method is not a good idea (unless you're satisfied with shallow copy in case there's no deep copy implementation). – Avi Aug 18 '13 at 23:25
    
Thanks for this, yeah I ended up using a shallow copy as there was really no need for a deep copy in this case. – bjackfly Aug 21 '13 at 7:05

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