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I am having trouble with this recurrence relation.

t(n) = 2t(n/2) + 1

Can anyone help me in explaining how one would go about solving this to get to the answer of O(n)? Thanks.

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Try drawing a tree. –  Matt Bryant Aug 18 '13 at 1:34
    
I've never been taught a method like that before, I'm not sure where to start with a tree? –  Twisterz Aug 18 '13 at 1:35
1  
A quick search for notes brings up math.dartmouth.edu/archive/m19w03/public_html/Section5-1.pdf. Drawing a tree won't help you prove the recurrence, but it's the best method (other than experience) that I know of for solving a recurrence. I highly recommend reading about it. –  Matt Bryant Aug 18 '13 at 1:38
    
I honestly did try a lot of googling before I posted on here, but thanks for those notes they are very helpful! –  Twisterz Aug 18 '13 at 1:42
    
I definitely can't blame you for not knowing what to search for if you've never seen anything like it. Good luck! –  Matt Bryant Aug 18 '13 at 1:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let's assume for simplicity that n is a power of 2. For example, if n = 8 and the base case T(0) = 0 then the tree of recursive call looks like that:

                       1                                n = 8, depth 0
                      / \
                     /   \
                    /     \
                   /       \
                  /         \
                 /           \
                /             \
               /               \
              /                 \
             /                   \
            /                     \
           1                       1                    n = 4, depth 1
          / \                     / \
         /   \                   /   \
        /     \                 /     \
       /       \               /       \
      /         \             /         \
     1           1           1           1              n = 2, depth 2
    / \         / \         / \         / \
   /   \       /   \       /   \       /   \
  1     1     1     1     1     1     1     1           n = 1, depth 3
 / \   / \   / \   / \   / \   / \   / \   / \
0   0 0   0 0   0 0   0 0   0 0   0 0   0 0   0         n = 0, depth 4

The tree has log(n) + 1 levels not counting the lowest level, because each node in this level has cost 0. In order to calculate T(n), in this case T(8), you have to sum up all ones in the tree.

Notice that on the depth i there are 2^i nodes, each with cost equal 1.

So the formula for a sum of ones in the tree is:

sum [from i = 0 to log(n)] 2^i

this is a geometric series with a_1 = 1 and q = 2, and you want to know the sum of first log(n) + 1 values. This is given by the formula:

(1 - 2^(log(n) + 1)) / (1 - 2) = 2n - 1

So for n = 8, the result is 15.

I hope this helps you.

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This is a good graphical representation of the computation in one of the comments. However, to extend this asymptotic to all numbers, you need additional properties (such as monotonicity of the function). This is what makes Theorem 4.1 in Cormen's book a bit tricky to prove –  alexsh Aug 18 '13 at 3:00

A good explanation of such relations is given in Cormen et al `Introduction to algoithms'. Master Theorem 4.1 in that book treats all recurrent relations of the form T(n) = aT(n/b) + f(n). for various combinations of f, a, and b. One of the cases in that theorem, case 2. can be applied to your example, giving the O(n) estimate. So, to answer your question, you cannot just solve such a relation in the sense of performing some routine computations to end up with a asymptotic, rather you observe that your situation belongs to a class of relations for which an estimate exists.

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However, I'm given the base case of T(1) = 0. At this point shouldn't it be solvable through steps? I was taught that was true at least... –  Twisterz Aug 18 '13 at 2:00
    
Sure, you can compute the sequence. One subtlety would be to interpret, say, what 3/2 stands for (that is, whether you interpret your relation as T(3) = 2T(floor(3/2))+1 or otherwise). Such a computation, however (even if you formalize the relation), would not help you show (read prove) that your T(n) = An + o(n), where o(n)/n tends to zero, although you can observe the pattern. –  alexsh Aug 18 '13 at 2:07
    
Is there any chance I could get you to show me how to properly compute the sequence? It would be much appreciated. –  Twisterz Aug 18 '13 at 2:08
    
Well, to simplify things, assume that your relation is T(n) = 2T(floor(n/2))+1. Then we get the following infinite loop: T(1)=0, T(2)=2T(2/2)+1=1, T(3)=2T(floor(3/2))+1=2T(1)+1=1, T(4)=2T(2)+1=3, and so on, ... You will not be able to get an analytical formula for this sequence though, since the continuous version of T is a fractal. –  alexsh Aug 18 '13 at 2:11
    
Can't you use this method: T(n)=2T(n/2) +n T(n) = 2(2T(n/4) +n/2) +n T(n)=4T(n/4) +n+n = 4T(n/4) + 2n In order to break it down, then find a pattern and substitute the base case in to find a solution? –  Twisterz Aug 18 '13 at 2:23

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