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I'm working on an android app, and when the app gets closed, I want it to save the contents of a specific array to a file, so that when the app is opened back up I can read the contents of it back into an array.

I could be wrong, but from my understanding, the method in which I should do this is the onStop() method.

The result is that when I hit the home button, the app closes and then gives me the "unfortunately, your app has crashed" message. I've tried running the debugger and my code seems to execute correctly up to and including the .close() command, but something after that seems to be happening. Below is my code, any help is much appreciated!

 @Override
public void onStop()
{
    try{

       FileOutputStream fOut = openFileOutput("savedVinyls", Context.MODE_PRIVATE);
       String vinylString = "Test";

       fOut.write(vinylString.getBytes());
       fOut.close();

    }
    catch(IOException OE){
        OE.getStackTrace();

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you include the StackTrace? –  JBirdVegas Aug 18 '13 at 2:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is because you are not calling the onStop super class implementation. Quote from google API library:

Derived classes must call through to the super class's implementation of this method. If they do not, an exception will be thrown.

So if you override Activity's onStop method, you must call super.onStop() at the start of the custom method. Try:

 @Override
public void onStop()
{
    super.onStop();
    try{

       FileOutputStream fOut = openFileOutput("savedVinyls", Context.MODE_PRIVATE);
       String vinylString = "Test";

       fOut.write(vinylString.getBytes());
       fOut.close();

    }
    catch(IOException OE){
        OE.getStackTrace();

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You're a genius! I didn't know that was something I had to call. Oops! Thanks very much, i've spent more time than I should've working on this, thinking the problem was something else. –  JGagnon Aug 18 '13 at 3:05

I would use the outputStreamWriter, it allows you to write strings to the file, rather than just bytes:

String test = "Test"; 

try{
   File outputFile = new File("your/file/name.txt");
   OutputStream outStream = new FileOutputStream(outputFile);
   OutputStreamWriter osWriter = new OutputStreamWriter(outStream);
   System.out.println("Writing data in file..!!");
   osWriter.write(str1);
   osWriter.close();
}
   catch(IOException OE){
    OE.getStackTrace();

}

Also, as noted by frogmanx, you need to include 'super.onStop()` in your method.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this, I was trying to figure out how to do such a thing! :) –  JGagnon Aug 18 '13 at 3:06
    
You're welcome. If you like it, upvote :) –  BlackHatSamurai Aug 18 '13 at 3:07
    
I can't yet! Not enough rep. Once I have enough to upvote i'll be sure to :D –  JGagnon Aug 18 '13 at 3:09
    
There is 5 more. Should be enough ;) –  BlackHatSamurai Aug 18 '13 at 3:12
1  
Have an upvote good sir! –  JGagnon Aug 19 '13 at 2:51

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