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If I write a for, do, or while loop, is it possible to come out of this with the return keyword?

Eg:

class BreakTest 
{
public static void Main() 
{
  for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++) 
  {
     if (i == 5) 
        **return;**
     Console.WriteLine(i);
    }
   }
}

I know return can be used to exit if statements so I am curious about this as I have never tried it (and can't access my software to write the code to test this).

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2  
Your index starts at 1... eww. :) –  Andy West Dec 1 '09 at 23:09
    
The index 1 is due to the indentation ... :-) –  Dan Cristoloveanu Dec 1 '09 at 23:15
1  
I copied this code from MSDN as it was. –  dotnetdev Dec 1 '09 at 23:30
3  
I know, it was just a joke. Starting an index at 1 isn't wrong, but it does make some developers twitch involuntarily. –  Andy West Dec 2 '09 at 0:04
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3 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

return will exit the current method (Main in your example). Use break to exit the loop.

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That's the distinction I was rusty on. Return if there is nothing else of interest to execute in the method. –  dotnetdev Dec 1 '09 at 23:31
1  
For @dotnetdev's benefit: the other loop control (well, generally speaking) is continue, which will stop the current iteration and begin the next, where as break and return exit this and all iterations. –  Todd Richardson Dec 2 '09 at 0:05
    
Continue I am happy with, use it a lot more. Return and break I haven't used in a while. Thanks. –  dotnetdev Dec 2 '09 at 0:15
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You can do this. Calling return; will exit Main(). Normally you'd use break; to break out of the for loop instead.

That being said, it's often considered bad practice to have multiple return locations within a single function. Many developers prefer to have a single return statement (if the method isn't declared with void). This can make the code more easy to follow, from an understandability point of view, and hence easier to maintain and test.

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I know the feeling about many return points in a single method! :) –  dotnetdev Dec 1 '09 at 23:32
2  
And, conversely, some code is easier to read and maintain if return statements are used rather than big conditional expressions or multiple nested conditionals. There are quite a few of these religious rules that that are applied blindly rather than considering what is more readable, maintainable or performant based upon the project's needs and context. (And I appreciated that you are pointing out the existence of this viewpoint rather than prescribing it, Reed.) –  Paul Ruane Dec 1 '09 at 23:37
    
I don't think that is always true, for instance you might want to have <tt>return</tt> statements inside of conditional blocks near the top of a function to return early in the case of improper inputs. However, you are correct that <tt>break</tt> is the correct way to exit a loop. –  John Scipione Dec 1 '09 at 23:40
    
@Paul and John: I don't really agree with this viewpoint as a "rule" as much as a guideline to at least consider when writing a method. I did want to point it out, though, because it's a common issue, especially when working with other dev teams. Some firms have hard-fast rules regarding this. –  Reed Copsey Dec 2 '09 at 16:15
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You certainly can do what you're asking. There seem to be 2 camps on whether or not you should. There are some who say that there should only be 1 exit point from a function. They suggest that you should use a flag variable to record that you need to exit (and possibly any data that you need to return), and then return once you've broken out of your loop or reached the end of your if/else trees.

Personally, I have no problem with multiple exit points from a function, as long as they are symmetric. What do I mean by "symmetric"? Well, if I am going to return from inside of a loop, then I also want to return at the end of the loop (in case I never reach the condition in the loop that would cause me to return early). If I'm inside of a complex if/else heirarchy and I return from within one of the cases, then I should return from within all of them.

Here are some quick examples of how I prefer to write my code:

    public string Search(IEnumerable<string> values)
    {
        foreach(string value in values)
        {
            if(SomeArbitraryCondition())
                return value;
        }

        return null;
    }

    public int PerformAction()
    {
        if (SomeArbitraryCondition())
        {
            if (SomeArbitraryCondition())
            {
                return 1;
            }
            else
            {
                return 2;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if (SomeArbitraryCondition())
            {
                return 3;
            }
            else
            {
                return 4;
            }
        }
    }

This isn't really a hard and fast rule that I've thought much about, but it's simply the way that I prefer to write it because it seems cleanest to me. In some cases, it makes more sense to use a flag variable and just return in one place.

    public string Search(IEnumerable<string> values)
    {
        string found = null;
        foreach(string value in values)
        {
            if(SomeArbitraryCondition())
                found = value;
        }

        return found;
    }

    public int PerformAction()
    {
        int state;
        if (SomeArbitraryCondition())
        {
            if (SomeArbitraryCondition())
            {
                state = 1;
            }
            else
            {
                state = 2;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if (SomeArbitraryCondition())
            {
                state = 3;
            }
            else
            {
                state = 4;
            }
        }

        return state;
    }
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