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I've been toying with MongoDB's aggregation framework quite a bit lately and thought it would be a good solution to a problem I've been trying to wrap my head around.

So, say I'm writing discussion board software and I have the following document structure for posts:

{
  '_id': ObjectId,
  'created_at': datetime,
  'poster_id': ObjectId,
  'discussion_id': ObjectId,
  'body': string
}

And I have the following (simplified) sample documents stored within the posts collection:

{
  '_id': 1,
  'created_at': '2013-08-18 12:00:00',
  'poster_id':  1,
  'discussion_id':  1,
  'body': 'imma potato'
}

{
  '_id': 2,
  'created_at': '2013-08-18 13:00:00',
  'poster_id':  1,
  'discussion_id':  1,
  'body': 'im still a potato'
}

{
  '_id': 3,
  'created_at': '2013-08-18 14:00:00',
  'poster_id':  2,
  'discussion_id':  1,
  'body': 'you are definitely a potato'
}

{
  '_id': 4,
  'created_at': '2013-08-18 15:00:00',
  'poster_id':  3,
  'discussion_id':  1,
  'body': 'Wait... he is potato?'
}

{
  '_id': 5,
  'created_at': '2013-08-18 16:00:00',
  'poster_id':  2,
  'discussion_id':  1,
  'body': 'Yes! He is potato.'
}

{
  '_id': 6,
  'created_at': '2013-08-18 16:01:00',
  'poster_id':  3,
  'discussion_id':  1,
  'body': 'IF HE IS POTATO... THEN WHO WAS PHONE!?'
}

What I am trying to do is return a distinct map of poster_ids with their latest post _id sorted by the latest post in descending order. So, in the end, given the above sample code, the mapping would look very similar to:

{
  3:6,
  2:5,
  1:2
}

Here is an example of a method I wrote in Python using pymongo's implementation of the MongoDB aggregation framework:

def get_posters_with_latest_post_by_discussion_ids(self, discussion_ids, start=None, end=None, skip=None, limit=None, order=-1):
    '''Returns a mapping of poster ids to their latest post associated with
    the given list of discussion_ids. A date range, ordering and paging properties
    can be applied.
    '''
    pipelines = []

    if order:
        pipelines.append({ '$sort': { 'created_at': order } })

    if skip:
        pipelines.append({ '$skip': skip })

    if limit:
        pipelines.append({ '$limit': limit })

    match = {
        'discussion_id': {
            '$in': discussion_ids
        }
    }

    if start and end:
        match['created_at'] = {
            '$gte': start,
            '$lt': end
        }

    pipelines.append({ '$match': match })
    pipelines.append({ '$project': { 'poster_id': '$poster_id' } })
    pipelines.append({ '$group': { '_id': '$poster_id', 'post_id': { '$first': '$_id' } } })

    results = self.db.posts.aggregate(pipelines)

    poster_to_post_map = {}
    for result in results['result']:
        poster_to_post_map[result['_id']] = result['post_id']

    return poster_to_post_map

Now that I have the mapping, I can query the posters and posts collections seperately for the full documents and then mung them together for display.

Now, the problem isn't that it doesn't work, it does... kind of. Say I have a much higher volume of posts and I want to page through a list of posters with their latest post. If my page limit is "10 posters per page" and within the resulting 10 documents there exists a single poster with 2, or more, posts, I actually get back fewer than 10 items in my map.

For example, I have 10 posts, 1 poster has 3 posts within the initial result. The aggregation framework will then discard the other 2 posts and associate the latest with that user, resulting in a map containing 8 entries, not 10.

This is extremely frustrating as I cannot reliably paginate through the results. Nor can I accurately determine whether or not I'm on the last page of results as a set of results may, or may not, return 0 or more matches.

What, if anything, am I doing wrong here?

What I am trying to accomplish is simple enough and the aggregation framework seems like a perfect fit for my problem.

This would be simple enough if it were a stored proc on a traditional relational database, but that's what we sacrifice when we move to schemaless document stores; relationships are managed outside of the context of the database.

Anyhow, the code should be pretty easy to follow and I'll answer any questions you might have.

Either way, thanks for taking the time to read. :)

Edit: SOLVED

Here is a gist of the solution for future viewers: https://gist.github.com/wilhelm-murdoch/6260469

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Its actually a pretty easy fix if you think about how the aggregation framework is described.

Taken from the docs:

Conceptually, documents from a collection pass through an aggregation pipeline, which transforms these objects as they pass through. For those familiar with UNIX-like shells (e.g. bash,) the concept is analogous to the pipe (i.e. |) used to string text filters together.

You may have read that before, but the reason to explain that again is that you can pass operations into that pipeline in just about any order - and more than once. Where as in MYSQL for example, LIMIT is always listed at the end of the query and applies to the result set after all other grouping functions.

In MongoDB, the operations are run in the order you've added them to the pipeline. So order of operation matters.

Looking at your your code above, it appears you're actually fetching everything - and depending on your IF statements, first ordering it, applying your offset and limit, then matching against that result set before projecting and grouping.

So - long story short - it just looks like you need to reorder things:

pipelines = []

match = {
    'discussion_id': {
        '$in': discussion_ids
    }
}

if start and end:
    match['created_at'] = {
        '$gte': start,
        '$lt': end
    }

pipelines.append({ '$match': match })

if order:
    pipelines.append({ '$sort': { 'created_at': order } })

pipelines.append({ '$project': { 'poster_id': '$poster_id' } })
pipelines.append({ '$group': { '_id': '$poster_id', 'post_id': { '$first': '$_id' } } })

if skip:
    pipelines.append({ '$skip': skip })

if limit:
    pipelines.append({ '$limit': limit })

results = self.db.posts.aggregate(pipelines)
share|improve this answer
    
I f--king swear to Christ, it's always some mundane little detail I seem to overlook. Sir, I am afraid I only have but one vote to give. Thank you! ** salutes –  Wilhelm Murdoch Aug 18 '13 at 7:47
    
Also, for anyone else in the future, here is a gist I threw together to illustrate @kmfk's solution: gist.github.com/wilhelm-murdoch/6260469 –  Wilhelm Murdoch Aug 18 '13 at 7:53
1  
@WilhelmMurdoch - Glad to help. :] –  kmfk Aug 18 '13 at 8:07
    
I like how clean this pipeline format is! –  drbv Dec 2 '13 at 2:54

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