Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a UDP Server that should sit and wait for a client to connect to it, and send it a string of a filename. Right now I just want it to echo back the filename to the client. Here is my code

Server

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <netdb.h>

#define MAXBUFLEN 1024

// Usage: ./server PORT
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int sockfd;
    struct sockaddr_in server;
    size_t clientSize;
    struct sockaddr_storage client;
    char buf[MAXBUFLEN];
    int portno = atoi(argv[1]);
    int numbytes;

    printf("Port: %d\n", portno);

    // Create UDP Socket
    if ((sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0)) == -1) {
    	perror("Can't create socket");
    	exit(-1);
    }

    // Configure socket
    memset(&server, 0, sizeof server);
    server.sin_family = AF_INET; // Use IPv4
    server.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY; // My IP
    server.sin_port = htons(portno); // Server Port

    // Bind socket
    if ((bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &server, sizeof(server))) == -1) {
    	close(sockfd);
    	perror("Can't bind");
    }

    while (1) {
    	printf("Waiting for data...\n");

    	// Receive data from Client
    	clientSize = sizeof(client);
    	numbytes = recvfrom(sockfd, buf, MAXBUFLEN-1,0,
    			(struct sockaddr *) &client, &clientSize);

    	buf[numbytes] = '\0';

    	printf("client sent: %s\n", buf);

    	// Rely to client
    	sendto(sockfd, buf, MAXBUFLEN-1, 0,
    			(struct sockaddr *) &client, &clientSize);
    }

    printf("Closing");
    close(sockfd);

    return 0;
}

Client

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <netdb.h>

#define MAXBUFLEN 1024

//Usage: ./client PORT IP FILE
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int sockfd;
    struct sockaddr_in server;
//  struct sockaddr_storage client;
    char buf[MAXBUFLEN];
    int portno = atoi(argv[1]);
    char *serverIP = argv[2];
    char *filename = argv[3];
    int numbytes;

    printf("Port: %d, IP:%s, File:%s\n", portno, serverIP, filename);

    // Create UDP Socket
    if ((sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0)) == -1) {
    	perror("Can't create socket");
    	exit(-1);
    }

    // The server IP and Port
    memset(&server, 0, sizeof server);
    server.sin_family = AF_INET; // Use IPv4
    server.sin_port = htons(portno); // Server Port
    struct hostent *hp = gethostbyname(serverIP);
    memcpy((char*)&server.sin_addr, (char*)hp->h_name, hp->h_length);

    printf("Sent %s\n", filename);

    // No need to bind, just send request for file
    int serverSize = sizeof(server);
    sendto(sockfd, argv[3], strlen(argv[3]), 0,
    		(struct sockaddr *) &server, serverSize);

    printf("Waiting for reply\n");

    recvfrom(sockfd, buf, MAXBUFLEN-1, 0,
    		(struct sockaddr *) &server, serverSize);

    buf[numbytes] = '\0';

    printf("server sent: %s\n", buf);

    close(sockfd);
}

So far the Server just prints out

Waiting for data...

only once... so its never getting a request.

and the Client prints out:

./client 8083 127.0.0.1 hello
Port: 8083, IP:127.0.0.1, File:hello
Sent hello
Waiting for reply
server sent:

Please help, I'm new to the world of C and UDP Sockets.

Oh yeah, and I already read Beej's Guide... please don't just post that as an answer.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the first place, there is a bug in the call to sendto of your server. clientSize should be a value, not a pointer. Also, as Tom said, numbytes should be set to the result of recvfrom.

The big problem is likely that you are copying hp->h_name into the sin_addr element of the server. h_name is the name of the host, not the IP address. Try replacing


    memcpy((char*)&server.sin_addr, (char*)hp->h_name, hp->h_length);

with


    memcpy((char*)&server.sin_addr, (char*)hp->h_addr_list[0], hp->h_length);

in your client.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Thanks ssooo much. I endded up changing my code around. I will post an answer with what I am running right now. –  Bernie Perez Dec 2 '09 at 0:23

Fixed the bug! Thank You Tommy. Here is what I am running right now.

Server:

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#define MAXBUFLEN 1024

void error(char *msg) {
    perror(msg);
    exit(0);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int sockfd;
    struct sockaddr_in server, client;
    int serverSize, clientSize, numbytes;
    char buf[MAXBUFLEN];
    int portno = atoi(argv[1]);

    if (argc < 2) {
    	fprintf(stderr, "ERROR, no port provided\n");
    	exit(0);
    }

    printf("Running on Port: %d\n", portno);

    // Create UDP Socket
    sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0);
    if (sockfd < 0) {
    	error("Can't create socket");
    }

    // Configure Server Info
    serverSize = sizeof(server);
    bzero(&server, serverSize);
    server.sin_family = AF_INET;
    server.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
    server.sin_port = htons(portno);

    // Bind
    if (bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &server, serverSize) < 0) {
    	error("binding");
    }

    clientSize = sizeof(struct sockaddr_in);

    while (1) {
    	printf("Waiting for Client Request...\n");
    	numbytes = recvfrom(sockfd, buf, MAXBUFLEN, 0,
    			(struct sockaddr *) &client, &clientSize);
    	if (numbytes < 0) {
    		error("recvfrom");
    	}
    	buf[numbytes] = '\0';

    	printf("Received request for File: %s\n", buf);
    	numbytes = sendto(sockfd, buf, sizeof(buf), 0,
    			(struct sockaddr *) &client, clientSize);
    	if (numbytes < 0) {
    		error("sendto");
    	}
    	sendFile(sockfd, client);
    }
}

sendFile(int sockfd, struct sockaddr_in client) {

}

Client:

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#define MAXBUFLEN 1024

void error(char *msg) {
    perror(msg);
    exit(0);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int sockfd;
    struct sockaddr_in server, client;
    int serverSize;
    struct hostent *hp;
    char buf[MAXBUFLEN];
    int numbytes;
    char *serverIP = argv[1];
    int portno = atoi(argv[2]);
    char *filename = argv[3];
    int done = 1;

    if (argc != 4) {
    	printf("Usage: SERVER PORT FILENAME\n");
    	exit(1);
    }

    // Create Socket
    sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0);
    if (sockfd < 0) {
    	error("Can't create socket");
    }

    // Configure Server Info
    server.sin_family = AF_INET;
    hp = gethostbyname(serverIP);
    if (hp == 0)
    	error("Unknown host");
    bcopy((char *) hp->h_addr, (char *) &server.sin_addr, hp->h_length);
    server.sin_port = htons(portno);
    serverSize = sizeof(struct sockaddr_in);

    // Send Message
    strcat(buf, filename);
    numbytes = sendto(sockfd, buf, strlen(buf), 0, &server, serverSize);
    if (numbytes < 0)
    	error("Sendto");
    bzero(buf, MAXBUFLEN);

    // Build file then set Done = 0
    while (done) {
    	numbytes = recvfrom(sockfd, buf, MAXBUFLEN, 0, &client, &serverSize);
    	if (numbytes < 0)
    		error("recvfrom");

    	done = 0;
    }

    printf("Received the packet: %s\n", buf);
}

I also found a great example here: http://www.linuxhowtos.org/C_C++/socket.htm

Thanks for everyone's help!

share|improve this answer
1  
As an aside, the b* functions (bzero(), bcopy, etc.) are "legacy" BSD library calls; the C standard likes the mem* versions. Oh, and the h_addr element in struct hostent is actually a macro for h_addr_lest[0], in case there is future confusion. –  Tommy McGuire Dec 2 '09 at 20:30

numbytes in your client is not initialised nor is it used! Check again in your code....

Hope this helps, Best regards, Tom.

share|improve this answer

Silly question, but is your firewall blocking port 8083.

Bob.

share|improve this answer
    
No it wasn't, good idea though. –  Bernie Perez Dec 2 '09 at 0:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.