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I have following sample data file, which I want to plot in gnuplot as a histogram

1   1
2   2
4   3

I am using following command to plot the data: plot "sample.data" with boxes, which produces following chart:

      ##
      ##
  ######
  ######
########
########

whereas, the chart should look like this (there should be no value for 3):

      ##
      ##
  ##  ##
  ##  ##
####  ##
####  ##

From help boxwidth I understand that: "By default, adjacent boxes are extended in width until they touch each other". This seems like a serious bug/misfeature to me. I want my data to be represented correctly, and not to plot nonexistent data. How can I trust gnuplot to represent my data correctly, when this simple example fails?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you had read also the other sentences around it, you would have seen, that the boxes are calculated automatically only if no exlicit boxwidth was specified. This can be done either by using a third column, or by setting one width with set boxwidth:

set boxwidth 1
plot "sample.data" with boxes

or

plot "sample.data" using 1:2:(1) with boxes

Note, that the boxwidth is given in units of the x-axis.

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1  
thanks, that works. My point was, however, that if this is the way gnuplot behaves, how can I be sure in the future, that my data is displayed correctly? Why does it misinterpret data by default, and only when additional parameters are provided are the data displayed correctly. Will I always have to worry, that I have perhaps missed some parameter, and that my chart is garbage? – Martin Vegter Aug 18 '13 at 11:02
    
I don't know why this is the default, but it could be worth discussing it with the gnuplot developers as set boxwidth affects several plotting styles. It could be useful maybe to have a default of calculating the width automatically, but use the minimum width for all boxes. However, if you set a fixed box width in your scripts you know, that the chart is correct. – Christoph Aug 18 '13 at 13:29
    
@Christoph This is nice, but makes the boxes quite ugly. They became thin vertical lines. Using set boxwidth 5 did not help. – Notinlist Nov 12 '14 at 10:15
    
@Notinlist The box width as given in the using statement is in units of the x-axis. Also set boxwidth 5 uses the x-axis units as reference. Using set boxwidth 1 relative uses a relative length, but that depends on the box spacing and isn't the same for all boxes. – Christoph Nov 12 '14 at 10:43
1  
@Notinlist In that case the x-unit is seconds, which may explain why your boxes are so small – Christoph Nov 12 '14 at 10:49

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