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Running COPY results in ERROR: invalid input syntax for integer: "" error message for me. What am I missing?

My /tmp/people.csv file:

"age","first_name","last_name"
"23","Ivan","Poupkine"
"","Eugene","Pirogov"

My /tmp/csv_test.sql file:

CREATE TABLE people (
  age        integer,
  first_name varchar(20),
  last_name  varchar(20)
);

COPY people
FROM '/tmp/people.csv'
WITH (
  FORMAT CSV,
  HEADER true,
  NULL ''
);

DROP TABLE people;

Output:

$ psql postgres -f sql_test.sql
CREATE TABLE
psql:sql_test.sql:13: ERROR:  invalid input syntax for integer: ""
CONTEXT:  COPY people, line 3, column age: ""
DROP TABLE

Trivia:

  1. PostgreSQL 9.2.4
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ended up doing this using csvfix:

csvfix map -fv '' -tv '0' /tmp/people.csv > /tmp/people_fixed.csv

In case you know for sure which columns were meant to be integer or float, you can specify just them:

csvfix map -f 1 -fv '' -tv '0' /tmp/people.csv > /tmp/people_fixed.csv

Without specifying the exact columns, one may experience an obvious side-effect, where a blank string will be turned into a string with a 0 character.

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1  
That's a handy tool. –  Craig Ringer Aug 18 '13 at 23:56
    
That's a link to the docs for an old version - latest is always at code.google.com/p/csvfix –  nbt Aug 22 '13 at 15:34

I think it's better to change your csv file like:

"age","first_name","last_name"
23,Ivan,Poupkine
,Eugene,Pirogov

It's also possible to define your table like

CREATE TABLE people (
  age        varchar(20),
  first_name varchar(20),
  last_name  varchar(20)
);

and after copy, you can convert empty strings:

select nullif(age, '')::int as age, first_name, last_name
from people
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Thank you, Roman. –  gmile Aug 18 '13 at 20:26

ERROR: invalid input syntax for integer: ""

"" isn't a valid integer. PostgreSQL accepts unquoted blank fields as null by default in CSV, but "" would be like writing:

SELECT ''::integer;

and fail for the same reason.

If you want to deal with CSV that has things like quoted empty strings for null integers, you'll need to feed it to PostgreSQL via a pre-processor that can neaten it up a bit. PostgreSQL's CSV input doesn't understand all the weird and wonderful possible abuses of CSV.

Options include:

  • Loading it in a spreadsheet and exporting sane CSV;
  • Using the Python csv module, Perl Text::CSV, etc to pre-process it;
  • Using Perl/Python/whatever to load the CSV and insert it directly into the DB
  • Using an ETL tool like CloverETL, Talend Studio, or Pentaho Kettle
share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice explanation –  Roman Pekar Aug 18 '13 at 10:59
    
Thank you, Craig. –  gmile Aug 18 '13 at 20:25

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