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I have these classes:

public interface IPerson
{
    string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Person : IPerson
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public interface IRoom
{
    List<Furniture> Furnitures { get; set; }
    List<Person> People { get; set; }
}

public class Room : IRoom
{
    public List<Furniture> Furnitures { get; set; }
    public List<Person> People { get; set; }
}

public enum Furniture
{
    Table,
    Chair
}

And I have this extension method:

public static void Assign<T>(this IRoom sender, Func<IRoom,ICollection<T>> property, T value)
{
    // How do I actually add a Chair to the List<Furniture>?

}

And I want to use it like this:

var room = new Room();
room.Assign(x => x.Furnitures, Furniture.Chair);
room.Assign(x => x.People, new Person() { Name = "Joe" });

But I have no idea how to add T to ICollection<T>.

Trying to learn generics and delegates. I know room.Furnitures.Add(Furniture.Chair) works better :)

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2 Answers 2

public static void Assign<T>(this IRoom room, Func<IRoom, ICollection<T>> collectionSelector, T itemToAdd)
{
    collectionSelector(room).Add(itemToAdd);
}
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You don't need a Func<IRoom,ICollection<T>> here. This takes room as argument and returns ICollection<T>. ICollection<T> as a parameter is enough. Let's rewrite your code as following to make it work.

public static void Assign<T>(this IRoom sender, ICollection<T> collection, T value)
{
    collection.Add(value);
}

Then call it as

room.Assign(room.Furnitures, Furniture.Chair);
room.Assign(room.People, new Person() { Name = "Joe" });

If you're not satisfied with this approach and you need your own approach only then try the following

public static void Assign<T>(this IRoom sender, Func<IRoom, ICollection<T>> property, T value)
{
    property(sender).Add(value);
}

Then call it with your own syntax should work

room.Assign(x => x.Furnitures, Furniture.Chair);
room.Assign(x => x.People, new Person() { Name = "Joe" });

Note:Keep in mind you've not initialized your collections, this will result in NullReferenceException, so to get rid of it add a contructor in your Room class as follows

public Room()
{
    Furnitures = new List<Furniture>();
    People = new List<Person>();
}
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