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I'm writing a compiler for a small language, and my Parser class is currently in charge of building an AST for use later. However, recursive expressions are not working correctly because the vector in each AST node that holds child nodes are not working correctly. Currently my AST's header file looks like this:

class AST
{
public:
    enum ASTtype {nil, fdecl, pdecl, vdecl, rd, wr, set, rdLV, setLV, exprLV, add, sub, mul, fcall,
    	divide, mod, lt, gt, lte, gte, eq, ne, aAnd, aOr, aNot, aNeg, nConst, t, f, vs, dl, loop,
    	cond, ss};
    enum scalarType {tNA, tINVALID, tINT, tLONG, tBOOL};
    AST ();
    AST (AST const&);
    AST (ASTtype);
    AST (ASTtype, std::string);
    void addChild(AST);
    ASTtype getNodeType();
    std::string text;
    ASTtype nodeType;
    int size;
    scalarType evalType;
    std::vector<AST> children;
};

Here's the expression parsing code that is causing trouble:

void Parser::e(AST& parent)
{
	AST expr;
	AST::ASTtype check = AST::nil;
	bool binOp = false;

	switch (lookahead.type)
	{
		case Lexer::AND    : check = AST::aAnd  ; binOp = true; break; 
		case Lexer::OR     : check = AST::aOr   ; binOp = true; break; 
		case Lexer::NOT    : check = AST::aNot  ; break;
		case Lexer::NEG    : check = AST::aNeg  ; break;
		case Lexer::PLUS   : check = AST::add   ; binOp = true; break;
		case Lexer::MINUS  : check = AST::sub   ; binOp = true; break;
		case Lexer::SPLAT  : check = AST::mul   ; binOp = true; break;
		case Lexer::FSLASH : check = AST::divide; binOp = true; break;
		case Lexer::MOD    : check = AST::mod   ; binOp = true; break;
		case Lexer::EQ     : check = AST::eq    ; binOp = true; break;
		case Lexer::LT     : check = AST::lt    ; binOp = true; break;
		case Lexer::GT     : check = AST::gt    ; binOp = true; break;
		case Lexer::GTE    : check = AST::gte   ; binOp = true; break;
		case Lexer::LTE    : check = AST::lte   ; binOp = true; break;
		case Lexer::NE     : check = AST::ne    ; binOp = true; break;
	}
	if (check != AST::nil && binOp)
	{
		match(lookahead.type);
		expr = AST(check);
		e(expr);
		e(expr);
	} else if (check != AST::nil && !binOp) {
		match(lookahead.type);
		expr = AST(check);
	} else if (lookahead.type == Lexer::IDENT) {

		if (symbols.resolve(lookahead.text).sym_type == symbol::FUNC)
		{
			expr = AST(AST::fcall, lookahead.text);
			match(Lexer::IDENT);
			while (lookahead.type != Lexer::BANG)
			{
				e(expr);
			}
			match(Lexer::BANG);
		} else {
			expr = AST(AST::exprLV);
			lv(expr);
		}
	} else if (lookahead.type == Lexer::T) {
		match(Lexer::T); //true
		expr = AST(AST::t);
	} else if (lookahead.type == Lexer::F) {
		match(Lexer::F); //false
		expr = AST(AST::f);
	} else {
		expr = AST(AST::nConst, lookahead.text);
		match(Lexer::NUM);
	}
	parent.children.push_back(expr);
}

An example expression that doesn't work is + 1 + 2 + 3 4. It should parse into an AST like this: + [1, + [2, + [3, 4]], but instead I get this: + [1, + []]

Any advice on what I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Can you give more detail about this "copy constructor bug"? Are you saying that if you have an AST that has other ASTs in children that it does not copy correctly? Why did you include the code for e() but not the copy constructor, if the copy constructor has a bug? –  Tim Sylvester Dec 2 '09 at 0:50
    
I say copy constructor as a guess. I'm honestly not sure what is causing the problem, and I thought if someone looked at e() it might reveal a bug or fundamental misunderstanding of C++ that I overlooked. –  iand675 Dec 2 '09 at 2:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

parent.children.push_back(expr) copies the expression. Hence, it calls AST::AST(AST const&). A bug in that could certainly cause the problem you see. However, without the code, we can't find bugs in it.

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