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In C++, is it possible to make a multi-statement macro with nested if statements inside of it like the one below? I've been attempting it for a while now and I'm getting a scope issue for the second if statement not being able to see 'symbol'. Maybe I need to understand macros further.

#define MATCH_SYMBOL( symbol, token)
     if(something == symbol){
          if( symbol == '-'){
          }else if (symbol != '-'){
          }
     other steps;
     }
share|improve this question
1  
A macro always fit on a single line. This keeps the errors messages of the compiler precise to the line despite pre-processing. Dav gives you the syntax for pretending several lines are a single one in his answer. – Pascal Cuoq Dec 2 '09 at 0:31
    
If you insist on doing this, use the convention here stackoverflow.com/questions/923822/… . – dmckee Dec 2 '09 at 0:54
up vote 11 down vote accepted

For a multi-line macro you need to add a \ character to the end of all but the last line to tell the macro processor to continue parsing the macro on the next line, like so:

#define MATCH_SYMBOL( symbol, token) \
     if(something == symbol){        \
          if( symbol == '-'){        \
          }else if (symbol != '-'){  \
          }                          \
     other steps;                    \
     }

Right now, it's trying to interpret it as a 1-line macro and then some actual code at the top of your file, which isn't what you want:

#define MATCH_SYMBOL( symbol, token)

// and then... wrongly thinking this is separate...

 if(something == symbol){ // symbol was never defined, because the macro was never used here!
      if( symbol == '-'){
      }else if (symbol != '-'){
      }
 other steps;
 }
share|improve this answer
2  
And be careful with doing this because it's not obvious to the user that this macro contains an if statement. A typical problem case is when you use such a statement inside a series of nested if-else statements with no brackets. – Nate C-K Dec 2 '09 at 0:31
    
Thanks, made it quite clear. – Jesse O'Brien Dec 2 '09 at 0:32
    
The solution is to add else (void)0 to the end of the macro, which both fixes block-scopes and forces a semicolon. – GManNickG Dec 2 '09 at 0:33
7  
Or use the famous do { } while(0) trick. – Tim Sylvester Dec 2 '09 at 0:35
    
Might as well add an else to an existing if-statement, though. – GManNickG Dec 2 '09 at 0:39

If you're using C++ you should avoid using macros altogether. They are not type-safe, they're not namespace-aware, they're hard to debug and just they're plain messy.

If you need a type-independent function, use templates:

template <typename T>
bool match_symbol(T symbol, T token) {
    if(something == symbol){
        if( symbol == '-'){
        }else if (symbol != '-'){
        }
    ...

or if the parameters can be different types:

template <typename T, typename V>
bool match_symbol(T symbol, V token) {
    if(something == symbol){
        if( symbol == '-'){
        }else if (symbol != '-'){
        }
    ...
share|improve this answer
    
I'd +1 if you have used the keyword inline. – LiraNuna Dec 2 '09 at 0:46
4  
@LiraNuna If it's in a header file you should include inline, but otherwise it's just a suggestion to the compiler that it's free to ignore. Whether to inline or not is irrelevant to my point. – Tim Sylvester Dec 2 '09 at 0:56
1  
Function templates don't need to be marked inline, because implicitly instantiated templates are (in effect) exempt from the one definition rule already. It's fine for two different translation units to create the same instantiation of the template, and then be linked together. – Steve Jessop Dec 2 '09 at 2:21
    
Function name shouldn't be all in capital letters. +1 anyway. – Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Dec 2 '09 at 5:31

Note that some of the answers here have a problem.

For example, for a normal statement you can do this:

if (foo)
   function();
else
   otherstuff();

If you followed some of the suggestions here, but if replace function with a macro, it might expand to:

if (foo)
   if (something) { /* ... */ }
   else           { /* ... */ }; // <-- note evil semicolon!
else
   otherstuff();

So a common (ugly) hack that people do to avoid this is:

#define MATCH_SYMBOL(symbol, token)    \
    do                                 \
    {                                  \
       if(something == symbol)         \
       {                               \
          if( symbol == '-')           \
          {                            \
          }                            \
          else if (symbol != '-')      \
          {                            \
          }                            \
          other steps;                 \
       }                               \
    }                                  \
    while (0) // no semicolon here

This is so that the "statement" MATCH_SYMBOL(a, b) can end with a semicolon just like a normal statement. You also have braces around the multiple statements.

If you think nobody's crazy enough to use this technique, think again. It's very common in the Linux kernel, for example.

share|improve this answer
    
There's at least one problem with your approach. If that code in the original macro (before converting to the do-while method above) contains a "break", it won't break out of the scope enclosing the macro because it's in the middle of a do-while loop inside the macro. There are similar problems with "continue". – Adisak Dec 22 '09 at 22:13
    
Explanation of above comment: Let's say we have a while loop that updates a list item at the end of the loop. We make a silly macro to emulate continue with this: #define CONTINUE item=item->next; continue This is two code statements which presents problems to using it with if statements. But wrapping as you suggest also poses problems: #define CONTINUE do{item=item->next; continue;}while(0) has a problem that the continue no longer works. The only solution I know is to use a non-loop wrapper: #define CONTINUE if(1){ item=item->next; continue; }else do{}while(0) – Adisak Dec 22 '09 at 22:20

You need to have a backslash (\) at the end of all the lines in the macro but the last one.

share|improve this answer

The way of the C++:

inline void MATCH_SYMBOL(const Symbol& symbol, const Token& token) {
    /* ... */
    if (something == symbol) {

    	if ('-' == symbol) {
    	/* ... */
    	}
    	else if ('-' != symbol) {
    	/* ... */
    	}
    }
    /* ...other steps... */
}
share|improve this answer
    
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the inline keyword is also in C99. – asveikau Dec 2 '09 at 1:06
    
@asveikau It is (though I am unsure why you brought that up (?) ) – justin Dec 2 '09 at 1:26
    
@justin: I imagine mostly because the original question isn't really limited to C++. In the cases where inline would be a suitable replacement for a macro in C++, it would be a suitable replacement in C99 as well. – quark Dec 2 '09 at 1:32
    
You said "the way of the C++". It's also pretty close to the way of the C99. (Though I didn't catch the use of references at the first glance.) – asveikau Dec 2 '09 at 1:33
    
Right, the C way is approximately 'static inline void MATCH_SYMBOL(const Symbol* const symbol, const Token* const token) { assert(symbol && token); if (symbol && token) {/* ... potato ... */} }'. There are enough differences in the C and C++ ways, and the title specified C++, so that is how I answered. – justin Dec 2 '09 at 1:58

also, see if you can replace the macro with a function.

?
MATCH_SYMBOL(Sym const & symbol, Tok const & token)
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

One can also define macro function and implement the function than

#define MATCH_SYMBOL( symbol, token) match_symbol(symbol,token)
share|improve this answer
1  
You can, but what's the point? – MSalters Dec 2 '09 at 9:41

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