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I trying to do a simple principal component analysis with matplotlib.mlab.PCA but with the attributes of the class I can't get a clean solution to my problem. Here's an example:

Get some dummy data in 2D and start PCA:

from matplotlib.mlab import PCA
import numpy as np

N     = 1000
xTrue = np.linspace(0,1000,N)
yTrue = 3*xTrue

xData = xTrue + np.random.normal(0, 100, N)
yData = yTrue + np.random.normal(0, 100, N)
xData = np.reshape(xData, (N, 1))
yData = np.reshape(yData, (N, 1))
data  = np.hstack((xData, yData))
test2PCA = PCA(data)

Now, I just want to get the principal components as vectors in my original coordinates and plot them as arrows onto my data.

What is a quick and clean way to get there?

Thanks, Tyrax

share|improve this question
up vote 16 down vote accepted

I don't think the mlab.PCA class is appropriate for what you want to do. In particular, the PCA class rescales the data before finding the eigenvectors:

a = self.center(a)
U, s, Vh = np.linalg.svd(a, full_matrices=False)

The center method divides by sigma:

def center(self, x):
    'center the data using the mean and sigma from training set a'
    return (x - self.mu)/self.sigma

This results in eigenvectors, pca.Wt, like this:

[[-0.70710678 -0.70710678]
 [-0.70710678  0.70710678]]

They are perpendicular, but not directly relevant to the principal axes of your original data. They are principal axes with respect to massaged data.

Perhaps it might be easier to code what you want directly (without the use of the mlab.PCA class):

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

N = 1000
xTrue = np.linspace(0, 1000, N)
yTrue = 3 * xTrue
xData = xTrue + np.random.normal(0, 100, N)
yData = yTrue + np.random.normal(0, 100, N)
xData = np.reshape(xData, (N, 1))
yData = np.reshape(yData, (N, 1))
data = np.hstack((xData, yData))

mu = data.mean(axis=0)
data = data - mu
# data = (data - mu)/data.std(axis=0)  # Uncommenting this reproduces mlab.PCA results
eigenvectors, eigenvalues, V = np.linalg.svd(data.T, full_matrices=False)
projected_data = np.dot(data, eigenvectors)
sigma = projected_data.std(axis=0).mean()
print(eigenvectors)

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax.scatter(xData, yData)
for axis in eigenvectors:
    start, end = mu, mu + sigma * axis
    ax.annotate(
        '', xy=end, xycoords='data',
        xytext=start, textcoords='data',
        arrowprops=dict(facecolor='red', width=2.0))
ax.set_aspect('equal')
plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
great, thanks. That's what I was looking for. – Tyrax Aug 18 '13 at 14:51
    
what the meaning of the 1.618 constant is ? where it comes from ? – joaquin Aug 18 '13 at 15:13
1  
@joaquin: Its approximately the golden ratio. You can, of course, choose any constant you like, but it often looks good. – unutbu Aug 18 '13 at 15:44
    
@unutbu: The two vectors are not orthogonal, something must be wrong here. – Tyrax Aug 19 '13 at 11:07
    
You are right. I've posted a fix. – unutbu Aug 19 '13 at 13:01

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