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I'm using this command to get the time that the versions (tags) of a project has been released.

git log --tags --simplify-by-decoration --pretty="format:%ci %d"

And the output is something like this:

2013-06-08 09:11:40 +0200  (2.1.4)   
2013-05-26 17:31:17 +0200  (2.1.3)  
2013-05-26 10:21:49 +0200  (2.1.2)  
2013-05-25 10:07:49 +0200  (2.1.1)  
2013-05-23 22:47:11 +0200  (2.1.0)   
2013-04-30 18:20:53 +0200  (2.0.11, origin/2.0_bugfix)   
2013-04-30 10:47:51 +0200  (2.0.10)   
2013-04-13 14:04:35 +0200  (2.0.9)   
2013-02-17 20:15:22 +0100  (2.0.8)

So what should I do in order to just get the versions that they haven't released in the same month? I would like to achieve this output.

2013-06-08 09:11:40 +0200  (2.1.4)   
    2013-05-23 22:47:11 +0200  (2.1.0)   
    2013-04-13 14:04:35 +0200  (2.0.9)   
    2013-02-17 20:15:22 +0100  (2.0.8)
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I don't understand. How do you determine, if a "version" is already released? A "version" is a tag? –  michas Aug 18 '13 at 15:37
    
Yes, a version is a tag. Is there anyway I can understand if it is released or not? –  Ehsan Aug 18 '13 at 15:45
    
What do you mean by released? Versions and releases are not concepts in git, there's just tags, which are arbitrary. –  Daenyth Aug 18 '13 at 16:01
    
Also, there are two types of tags. Lightweight tags (which are just pointers to commits like branches) and annotated tags (which have metadata of their own such as tag date, author and message). Using git log you will only get the commitdate of the commit pointed to by both types of tags. (instead of the tag date of any annotated tag objects) Are you using annotated tags and does this distinction matter to you? –  Charlie Aug 18 '13 at 16:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

[Edit to add: as commenters noted, there's no notion of "released" in git; I've assumed your git log already does whatever magic you want, except for skipping over all but the last line for a given month.]

I doubt there is anything built in to git to do this, but it's easy to do in awk. I saved your git log output in the file log:

$ awk -F- '$2 != prev { if (keep) print keep; keep = $0; prev = $2 } \
    END { print keep }' < log
2013-06-08 09:11:40 +0200  (2.1.4)   
2013-05-26 17:31:17 +0200  (2.1.3)  
2013-04-30 18:20:53 +0200  (2.0.11, origin/2.0_bugfix)   
2013-02-17 20:15:22 +0100  (2.0.8)

(note that I have no idea what your indentation means so I did not attempt to produce that).

The awk command is:

  • set field separator to '-' (so that $1 is 2013, $2 is 06, etc)
  • for each line, if $2 is different from the previous $2:
    1. print previous saved line if any
    2. save the line and the $2 value
  • at the end, print the saved line

This assumes there's at least one line; add if (keep) if needed for empty git log output. The thing with prev and keep is to make sure we print only the last line for a given month, as in your example output.

Edit again: Oops, I printed the first line instead of the last, which means the keep bits are silly, we can just print the line when we encounter it. Your sample output prints the last line, which means we want to replace keep when $2==prev:

awk -F- '\
$2 == prev { keep = $0; } \
$2 != prev { if (keep) print keep; keep = $0; prev = $2 } \
END { print keep }'

In any case, that's the general idea: once you have all the tag logs you want, filter them with awk or similar.

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