Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Before I start I should state that I'm new to both YAML and JSON so the rules of formatting are not that clear.

I'm trying to write a Perl script (Perl because I know it to exist on all of our servers.) which will update several network-related settings for various hosts. My preference is to have all of the settings in a single file and update the configurations based on which host the script is running on.

I looked at YAML, but I'm a bit put off by the fact that I can't do something like:

host:
  hostname: first
    interface: eth0
      oldip: 1.2.3.4
      newip: 2.3.4.5
      oldgw: 1.2.3.1
      newgw: 2.3.4.1
    interface: eth1
      oldip: 1.2.3.4
      newip: 2.3.4.5
      oldgw: 1.2.3.1
      newgw: 2.3.4.1

host:
  hostname: second
    interface: eth0
      oldip: 1.2.3.4
      newip: 2.3.4.5
      oldgw: 1.2.3.1
      newgw: 2.3.4.1
    interface: eth1
      oldip: 1.2.3.4
      newip: 2.3.4.5
      oldgw: 1.2.3.1
      newgw: 2.3.4.1

That is to say, I've plugged this into YAML validators and it has failed.

I have figured out that, for YAML, I can do the following:

host: "first"
interface1:
  name: eth0
  oldip: 1.2.3.4
  newip: 2.3.4.5
  oldgw: 1.2.3.1
  newgw: 2.3.4.1
interface2:
  name: eth1
  oldip: 1.2.3.4
  newip: 2.3.4.5
  oldgw: 1.2.3.1
  newgw: 2.3.4.1

This is less than desirable, though, as it makes having multiple hosts in one file impossible. I'm basing this on the fact that I keep getting errors from the online validators that I've used when I do attempt this.

I've looked at using JSON, but I don't know all of the rules for that either. I do know that the following does not work:

{
    "host": "first",
    "interface1": {
        "newip": "2.3.4.5",
        "oldip": "1.2.3.4",
        "oldgw": "1.2.3.1",
        "name": "eth0",
        "newgw": "2.3.4.1"
    },
    "interface2": {
        "newip": "2.3.4.5",
        "oldip": "1.2.3.4",
        "oldgw": "1.2.3.1",
        "name": "eth1",
        "newgw": "2.3.4.1"
    }
}

{
    "host": "second",
    "interface1": {
        "newip": "2.3.4.5",
        "oldip": "1.2.3.4",
        "oldgw": "1.2.3.1",
        "name": "eth0",
        "newgw": "2.3.4.1"
    },
    "interface2": {
        "newip": "2.3.4.5",
        "oldip": "1.2.3.4",
        "oldgw": "1.2.3.1",
        "name": "eth1",
        "newgw": "2.3.4.1"
    }
}

Is there a format I can use that will allow me to store all of the host and their information in a single file that can be parsed?

If either YAML or JSON are suitable, what am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
2  
It's harder for humans to write correct YAML and JSON than it is to read it. You should build your initial data structure in Perl and use Perl to write it out to a file, at least at first. Then, if you're brave, you can make small changes to the file by hand. – mob Aug 18 '13 at 16:42
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your YAML problem with host is the same as what it was initially with interface: You're trying to put subkeys at the same level as the keys that contain them.

host:
  name: first
  interface1:
    name: eth0
    oldip: 1.2.3.4
    newip: 2.3.4.5
    oldgw: 1.2.3.1
    newgw: 2.3.4.1
  interface2:
    name: eth1
    oldip: 1.2.3.4
    newip: 2.3.4.5
    oldgw: 1.2.3.1
    newgw: 2.3.4.1

should work, although that still doesn't address your need for multiple hosts. For that (and to better handle multiple interfaces), you should use lists:

host:
  - name: first_host
    interface:
      - name: eth0
        oldip: 1.2.3.4
        newip: 2.3.4.5
        oldgw: 1.2.3.1
        newgw: 2.3.4.1
      - name: eth1
        oldip: 1.2.3.4
        newip: 2.3.4.5
        oldgw: 1.2.3.1
        newgw: 2.3.4.1
  - name: second_host
    interface:
    - ...

When read in by Perl, this will give you the structure:

{
  "host": [
    {
      "interface": [
        {
          "newip": "2.3.4.5", 
          "oldip": "1.2.3.4", 
          "oldgw": "1.2.3.1", 
          "name": "eth0", 
          "newgw": "2.3.4.1"
        }, 
        {
          "newip": "2.3.4.5", 
          "oldip": "1.2.3.4", 
          "oldgw": "1.2.3.1", 
          "name": "eth1", 
          "newgw": "2.3.4.1"
        }
      ], 
      "name": "first_host"
    }
  ]
}

As far as JSON, that's a subset of YAML. Personally, I prefer to have the full YAML spec available to me, but JSON provides more interoperability with non-Perl languages.

share|improve this answer
    
YAML is supported by every modern language, (you might need an external library, but still...). let me know if there's an exception. – Karoly Horvath Aug 18 '13 at 17:36
    
@KarolyHorvath - Fair point. I wasn't thinking so much of languages as that individual programs are more likely to include JSON support than YAML support, although Perl programs seem more likely to include YAML support than programs in other languages. But I worded it poorly. – Dave Sherohman Aug 18 '13 at 17:39
    
I see. So is the list you indicated a part of YAML or does it simply look similar? I did plug it into a YAML validator and it checked out so I'm guessing it is just another feature of YAML. – theillien Aug 18 '13 at 17:57
    
@theillien - Lists (officially called "sequences") are a part of YAML, yes. You can find examples of them in the YAML 1.2 specification at yaml.org/spec/1.2/spec.html#id2759963 – Dave Sherohman Aug 18 '13 at 19:57
    
@DaveSherohman Thanks much. I think this information will help significantly. – theillien Aug 18 '13 at 20:22

I'd prefer JSON over YAML. I recently built a system whose "user interface" (ha) was basically one giant config file; the user needed to edit that config file to control the system; and I used YAML for that file. It turns out that YAML has a few really annoying gotchas that make it unsuitable for humans -- it's very picky about whitespace, for example.

Also, it's less familiar in general: I'd guess that anyone with programming experience has run into JSON, and understands it. But YAML is more niche.

If you're not using the advanced features of YAML -- such as the ability to define variables and then reference them later -- I'd recommend that you go with JSON instead.

share|improve this answer

Do not care about the format. Populate a data structure and let JSON or YAML do the dirty work for you. If you are going to produce and parse the files yourself anyway, there is almost no advantage in using JSON or YAML.

share|improve this answer

The exact format is unimportant: both YAML and JSON are fine. Actually, I would recommend to keep this specific part pluggable.

The issue with your YAML is that the data structure has to make some sense, e.g.:

- host:
    hostname: first
    interfaces:
      eth0:
        oldip: 1.2.3.4
        newip: 2.3.4.5
        oldgw: 1.2.3.1
        newgw: 2.3.4.1
      eth1:
        oldip: 1.2.3.4
        newip: 2.3.4.5
        oldgw: 1.2.3.1
        newgw: 2.3.4.1
- host:
    hostname: second
    interfaces:
      ...

Or if the interfaces have to be ordered:

- host:
    hostname: first
    interfaces:
      -
        name: eth0
        oldip: 1.2.3.4
        newip: 2.3.4.5
        oldgw: 1.2.3.1
        newgw: 2.3.4.1
      -
        name: eth1
        oldip: 1.2.3.4
        newip: 2.3.4.5
        oldgw: 1.2.3.1
        newgw: 2.3.4.1

If writing YAML manually is to tedious for you, just write a small script that generates it for you.

Note that lists have to be somehow introduces by a marker like -. Intendation is not sufficient for this.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.