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Given a directed tree T with a variable number of children per node, I would like to find a path the size of PATH_SIZE of "good" nodes starting from root.

every node has an isGood() method and a getChildren() method that work as expected.

A simple DFS recursive solutions would look like this: (please correct me if I'm wrong)

function findGoodPath(node, depth){
    if(!node.isGood()){
        return null;
    } else if (depth==PATH_SIZE){
        return [node];
    }
    var children = node.getChildren();
    for (var i=0; i<children.length; i++){
        var result = findGoodPath(children[i], depth+1);
        if (result){
            return result.concat([node]);
        }
    }
    return null;
}

Calling findGoodPath(root, 1) should find a result if one exists.

Now for the problem: thegetChildren() method of the node object is actually an async method that does I/O behind the scenes. it returns nothing and expects a single callback argument to handle returned children.

A modified code solution (which is WRONG) can look like this:

function findGoodPath(node, depth){
    if(!node.isGood()){
        return null;
    } else if (depth==PATH_SIZE){
        return [node];
    }
    node.getChildren(function(children){
        for (var i=0; i<children.length; i++){
            var result = findGoodPath(children[i], depth+1);
            if (result){
                return result.concat([node]);
            }
        }
    });
}

This solution won't work: all the getChildren methods of a single node's children will be called at once, so it will actually perform a BFS. and worse, the return statements are associated with the anonymous callback function and will execute after the enclosing function has finished running.

It's clear that there is a need for some sort of a flow control mechanism. What is a simple and elegant solution for this problem?

UPDATE: I've accepted Sebastien's answer since it solves this problem with a recursion, which is how I presented the question. I've also posted an answer which uses the async's library whilst loop, this is what I ended up using. Sebastien was kind enough to benchmark these two methods here. (spoiler: performance is identical)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

first, I think you have to call findGoodPath(children[i], depth + 1) if you want the depth equals the PATH_SIZE.

then, you do have a problem of closure. With your async call you always concat with a node instance wich is not the one you want.

One way you could do that could be :

node.getChildren((function(_node) {
  return function(children){
    for (var i=0; i<children.length; i++){
      var result = findGoodPath(children[i], depth);
        if (result){
          return result.concat([_node]);
        }
      }
    });
})(node));

But I think it's just a part of the problem as you're mixing sync function with async function. The line:

var result = findGoodPath(children[i], depth)

is written as a sync call whereas findGoodPath is an async function, so it has to be written with callbacks too!

Hope it helps

ps: it would help to have a jsfiddle...

UPDATE : just a try. As I cannot test, it's not working, but it's the idea. I can't figure out if you need to create another scope in the second findGoodPath call, just as in the getChildren call

function findGoodPath(node, depth, callback){
  if(!node.isGood()){
    return callback(null);
  } else if (depth==PATH_SIZE){
    return callback([node]);
  }
  node.getChildren((function(_node, _callback) {

    return function(children){
      var node = _node, callback = _callback;

      for (var i=0; i<children.length; i++){
        findGoodPath(children[i], depth, function(result) {
          if (result){
            return callback(result.concat([node]));
          }
        });
      }
    });
  })(node, callback));
}
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Thanks Sebastien, excellent remarks! –  Tomer Weller Aug 18 '13 at 20:22
    
my bad, of course the function needs to have a callback argument. The non functional code sample was just to showcase some of the issues with turning this into async. I'll take a look at it in the morning but my current direction is to move to a non-recursion solution and then use functions from js async library to control the flow. Combining async functions and recursion is a nice challenge but I'm afraid it creates un maintainable code (to me at least). –  Tomer Weller Aug 18 '13 at 20:28
    
True! But being able to do it in an async way would be very efficient, and is surely a nice challenge :) –  Sebastien C. Aug 18 '13 at 20:33
    
I couldn't get it to work. Can you show a fiddle? you can use my fiddle as a base: jsfiddle.net/tomerweller/vq6ag –  Tomer Weller Aug 19 '13 at 18:34
    
here you are : jsfiddle.net/vq6ag/8 (I just checked in jsperf, and for that kind of node with have the same speed for both method: jsperf.com/treedfsnode) –  Sebastien C. Aug 19 '13 at 19:27

I'm not 100% in focus now, but I am almost sure Async.js seriestasks is the right solution for you (If not seriestasks I'm willing to bet there is another control flow in Async.js that will do the trick.

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OK, so there are several ways to achieve an async DFS traversal. Since async recursions have a tendency to become somewhat ugly, I've decided to get rid of the recursion.

I first re-implemented the synchronous version of the function using a while loop instead of a recursion:

function findGoodPathLoop(root){
    var nodesToVisit = [{data: root, path:[]}];
    while (nodesToVisit.length>0){
        var currentNode = nodesToVisit.pop();
        if (currentNode.data.isGood()){
            var newPath = currentNode.path.concat(currentNode.data);
            if (newPath.length==PATH_SIZE){
                return newPath;
            } else {
                var childrenNodes = currentNode.data.getChildren().map(function(child){
                    return {data: child, path: newPath};
                });
                nodesToVisit = nodesToVisit.concat(childrenNodes);
            }
        }
    }
    return null;
}

Note: I saved the entire path for each node, this is not a necessity, you can just save the depth and maintain an array of the current path, though it's a bit messier.

I then used the async library to convert this function to an async one, replacing the standard while() function with async's whilst():

function findGoodPathAsync(root, pathCallback){
    var result = null;
    var nodesToVisit = [{data: root, path:[]}];
    async.whilst(
        function(){
            return nodesToVisit.length>0 && result==null ;
        },
        function(next) {
            var currentNode = nodesToVisit.pop();
            if (currentNode.data.isGood()){
                var newPath = currentNode.path.concat(currentNode);
                if(newPath.length==PATH_SIZE){
                    result = newPath;
                    next();
                } else {
                    currentNode.data.getChildren(function(children){
                        var childrenNodes = children.map(function(child){
                            return {data: child, path: newPath};
                        });
                        nodesToVisit = nodesToVisit.concat(childrenNodes);
                        next();
                    });
                }
            } else {
                next();
            }
        },
        function(err) {
            //error first style callback
            pathCallback(err, result);
        }
    );
}

Not a pretty one, but it's readable and it does the job.

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