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I'm trying to make an AtomicReference class in C# and I want to keep the field reference protected, but I also need to return the value in the get method:

class AtomicReference
{
    private Object _value;

    public AtomicReference()
    {
        _value = new Object();
    }

    public AtomicReference(Object value)
    {
        OptimisticSet(value);
    }

    public Object CompareAndSet(Object newValue)
    {
        return Interlocked.Exchange(ref _value, newValue);
    }

    public void OptimisticSet(Object newValue)
    {
        do { 
        } while (_value == Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _value, _value, newValue));
    }

    public Object Get()
    {
        // Don't leak the field reference
        const Object constVal = _value;
        return constVal;
    }
}

It's a bit of a clumsy way around the problem... I can't make the field readonly, because I need to be able to set it. Is there a better solution than mine?

UPDATE: Thanks for the quick responses! It was rightfully pointed out that the reference will be protected if I simply return _value. I also want to protect the _value from mutating. If I allow the _value to mutate outside of the AtomicReference, then it defeats the entire purpose of making this class... is there a way to achieve that?

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1  
Why is there a java tag? –  SLaks Dec 2 '09 at 2:15
    
I just took out the java tag –  Suppressingfire Dec 2 '09 at 2:18
1  
The java tag meaning that I want to get similar functionality to Java's AtomicReference. –  Lirik Dec 2 '09 at 2:29
    
By the way, you should make it a generic class. –  SLaks Dec 2 '09 at 2:37
1  
If you add a ` where T : class` constraint to the class definition, you'll be able to use the == operator. –  SLaks Dec 2 '09 at 2:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Even if you try, it is not possible to return a reference to a field in C# (without unsafe code) or Java. (I don't mean a reference to an object)

You can simply write return _value; your callers will not be able to write to the field.

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1  
True that callers cannot change _value itself to refer to a different object, but won't callers be able to mutate the object that _value refers to? For example, if object is really of type Square, callers will be able to do obj.Side++. My understanding of the question is that he wishes to avoid such mutations. –  G-Wiz Dec 2 '09 at 2:16
1  
If so, he's out of luck; that's not possible to do. (Unless you restrict to value types or IClonable) From the fact that he accepted the answer, I assume that he isn't. –  SLaks Dec 2 '09 at 2:18
    
Yeah I re-read the sample and it looks like he only cares about the references. –  G-Wiz Dec 2 '09 at 2:19
    
Why did you unaccept the answer? –  SLaks Dec 2 '09 at 2:23
    
Not possible to do? Do I have to clone the object? A constant won't do it? What's the solution? –  Lirik Dec 2 '09 at 2:28

C# does not support C++'s const keyword, which allows for immutable references to mutable objects.

There are only two ways to do what you're asking.

  • You could clone the object whenever you return it. Note that this will only work for clonable objects, and it'll be quite slow.
  • You could only support value types.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I'm sorry, I was inadvertently thinking of two separate ideas... I was thinking of passing an Int32/Int64 to the AtomicReference class, completely blanking out that the proper way to do it is with an AtomicInteger. –  Lirik Dec 2 '09 at 2:43

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