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I'm working in an IRB shell on a dos CMD

I load a module from a mystuff file require '.\mystuff'

I change the module in the mystuff file and I type again require '.\mystuff'

How come the IRB does not pick up the changes in the file when I try to call functions or variables from the newest version of my mystuff module?

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you can load a module using include 'MyModule' :) – Nich Aug 19 '13 at 0:58
up vote 2 down vote accepted

require will not load the same file twice. If you want to load the file again, you need to use load. See What is the difference between include and require in Ruby? for more information.

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You also need to add the file type when using load, so require '.\mystuff' corresponds to load '.\mystuff.rb'. – Borodin Aug 18 '13 at 21:16

Your Syntax is Wrong

Ruby doesn't use backslashes. You need to use forward slashes, or use File#join.

Your $LOAD_PATH is Wrong

Your $LOAD_PATH (a.k.a $:) is wrong. You need to include the present working directory with:

$: << '.'

in irb, or use Kernel#require_relative in executable or sourced files.

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There is nothing wrong with using backslashes in Ruby file paths. Ruby is happy with either. – Borodin Aug 18 '13 at 21:17
    
@Borodin The backslash is an escape character. If it works for you, great, but it's generally the cause of a great number of easily-fixed problems. – CodeGnome Aug 18 '13 at 21:33
    
The OP is using a single-quoted string, so a backslash is not treated as an escape character here. The load path must be right, or else the first require call would have failed. – Andrew Marshall Aug 19 '13 at 1:01
    
@AndrewMarshall You appear to be making unwarranted assumptions. There is no properly-formatted executable code listed by the OP, nor does the OP state that there aren't error messages. Please feel free to add your own answer after making your own assumptions about the thoroughness or correctness of the original post. – CodeGnome Aug 19 '13 at 2:11
    
@CodeGnome There is 100% valid code in the original post. Just because they didn’t use code formatting doesn’t mean it’s wrong. And “does not pick up changes when [calling methods]” means the methods do work, thus the $LOAD_PATH was set right. Your making assumptions that there were errors. – Andrew Marshall Aug 19 '13 at 2:22

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