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I have a simple server that uses generics and object serialization. (T is the input format, U is the output format). A simplified version that only deals with input is shown below:

public class Server <T, U> implements Runnable {

    @override
    public void run () {

    try (ObjectInputStream inReader = new ObjectInputStream (this.connection.getInputStream ())) {
        T   lastObj;
        while (true) {
            lastObj = (T) inReader.readObject ();
            System.out.println (lastObj.getClass ().getName ());
            if (null != lastObj) {
                this.acceptMessage (lastObj);
            }
        } catch (IOException | ClassNotFoundException ex) {
            Logger.getLogger (this.getClass ().getName ()).log (Level.SEVERE, ex.getMessage (), ex);
        }
    }
}

If I start the server with

Server <Integer, String> thisServer = new Server ();

then I would expect it to only accept Integer objects and return Strings as output.

However, I was using a simple client that read from System.in for testing and sending strings to the server. Much to my surprise, the server accepted the input. Just to make sure that it really was accepting an object that wasn't of type T I added the line to echo out what class the last object was.

System.out.println (lastObj.getClass ().getName ());

This did in fact output Java.lang.String.

This is totally unexpected. I thought Generics were supposed to allow you to pass objects of a type that wasn't specified in the class itself without having to cast objects? The cast to T doesn't seem to have an effect either.

This means in theory I could attack the server (or its consumer) by feeding it Java objects of a type it wasn't expecting. Whilst this doesn't have to be super-robust (because it's an academic project and not production software) I think knowing that the object that you got with readObject wasn't the one you wanted so you can deal with it is important.

I tried adding the following, but it just got flagged up as a compile time error.

if (lastObj instanceof T) {
}

How would I handle this correctly?

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2  
Didn't you get a compiler warning when you created the Server? –  Rohit Jain Aug 18 '13 at 21:53
    
The code given is massively simplified from the real server (which supports multiple connections and all kinds of stuff like that), but no. I didn't get any compile errors until I tried adding the instanceof T check. –  GordonM Aug 18 '13 at 22:01
    
I said compiler warning not error. You are creating an instance of Server using raw type - new Server ();. Try changing it to - new Server<>();. And of course, you can do an instanceof check with type parameter T, because that check is done at runtime, when there is no information about T, due to type erasure. –  Rohit Jain Aug 18 '13 at 22:03
    
If I add diamonds to the new call they get highlighted as unnecessary by Netbeans. If it necessary to put an empty diamond in there? And no, I didn't get any warnings either. The worst I got was a compiler note about file operations. (EDIT: new Server() and new Server<>() produces no noticeable difference. Not does new Server <SomeClass> (), which got flagged as unnecessary) –  GordonM Aug 18 '13 at 22:07
1  
Type erasure at its worst. –  luiscubal Aug 18 '13 at 22:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As others have pointed out, this issue is related to type erasure. At runtime, T has been erased to its upper bound, Object.

When you cast to T, that's known as an unchecked cast because it doesn't exist at runtime. Instead, other casts have been inserted by the compiler in places where instances of T are assigned back to a reified type like Integer. When run consumes an unexpected type like String, the JVM can't tell the difference, and it doesn't fail fast. If there were a method T getLastObject, the caller of that method might fail instead:

Server<Integer, String> thisServer = ...;
thisServer.run(); // consumes a String, but doesn't fail
Integer i = thisServer.getLastObject(); // ClassCastException thrown here

The workaround is to provide Server with a Class<T> object representing the type of object to be consumed and use the cast method:

public class Server <T, U> implements Runnable {

   private final Class<T> readObjectType;

   public Server(final Class<T> readObjectType) {
       this.readObjectType = readObjectType;
   }

    @Override
    public void run () {

    try (ObjectInputStream inReader = new ObjectInputStream (this.connection.getInputStream ())) {
        T   lastObj;
        while (true) {
            lastObj = readObjectType.cast(inReader.readObject());
            System.out.println (lastObj.getClass ().getName ());
            if (null != lastObj) {
                this.acceptMessage (lastObj);
            }
        } catch (IOException | ClassNotFoundException ex) {
            Logger.getLogger (this.getClass ().getName ()).log (Level.SEVERE, ex.getMessage (), ex);
        }
    }
}

readObjectType.cast(inReader.readObject()) will now fail fast when the wrong type of object has been read.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 That's a great answer. I was not aware of this "lazy-fail" mechanism. I just tried it out and indeed the class cast exception will be thrown only when you try to access the object and not at the point of the unchecked cast. –  c.s. Aug 19 '13 at 6:24
    
@c.s. Yep, that's known as "polluting the heap" and is why the compiler will warn you about unchecked conversions. See my "Note about heap pollution" at the bottom of this answer for more details. –  Paul Bellora Aug 19 '13 at 6:31
    
Wow, that's a hell of a gotcha. I'm still pretty new to writing serious applications in Java so it's always good to know stuff like that (most programming assignments up to now have been to write a missing method for a provided class, or a missing class for a provided application). –  GordonM Aug 19 '13 at 7:10

The thing to remember about generics is that they are compile time checks only. Their sole purpose is to remove type casting everywhere.

the following line

lastObj = (T) inReader.readObject ();

at runtime translates to

lastObj = (Object) inReader.readObject ();

not

lastObj = (Integer) inReader.readObject ();

to allow for runtime casting what we can do is this

public class Server <T extends Integer, U> implements Runnable {

this will translate at

lastObj = (T) inReader.readObject ();

to

lastObj = (Integer) inReader.readObject ();

So lastObj can start to use Integer methods. This will also throw a ClassCastException should the read object not be an Integer. There are limitations on what Generics can achieve in java due to the runtime erasure.

The reason we need a Cast is to do with the separation between compile time checking and runtime checking.

InputStream.readObject() returns an Object not a T whatever that is so while the runtime says T is Object, the Compile time checker cannot make that assumption so must ask for a cast.

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It would seem like a pointless cast to have then, but if it's not there, it gets flagged as an incompatible types error. If generics doesn't offer any kind of protection when unserializing with readObject then how do I ensure I got the type I expected without explicitly hard-coding it into the server class? –  GordonM Aug 18 '13 at 22:24
    
I didn't understand. Why not cast to (Integer)? –  c.s. Aug 18 '13 at 22:28
    
Because I was hoping to make the server generic and determine the type externally. –  GordonM Aug 18 '13 at 22:45
1  
@GordonM With Serialization you need to do some sort of runtime type checking yourself. The only thing the serializer will check is that it recognises the class of the object and the object is properly formed to be loaded. I suggest you wrap the read with a type check and make the call with a parameter of the type you want. eg readMyObject(Class<? extends T> objectOfType) –  BevynQ Aug 18 '13 at 22:53
    
@c.s. It is due to type erasure it will cast to the most generic class that it can, in this instance that is Object. –  BevynQ Aug 18 '13 at 22:55

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