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I write a piece of code in c++ to test the limit of file output in 64-bit (redhat linux) system. The hard drive and memory are pretty big (1TB and 64Gb). I think the maximum size of the output file is 2^63 bytes since due to the 64bit address. I use sizeof to verify the following datatype in the c++ (g++ compiler)

sizeof(double) = 8, sizeof(size_t) = 8, sizeof(std::streamsize) = 8

The following code works good

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  char data[200000][10000];

  fstream outfile("output.dat", ios::out | ios::binary);
  outfile.write(&data[0][0], 200000*10000);
  outfile.close();

  return 0;
}

But if I use double instead

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  double data[200000][10000];

  fstream outfile("output.dat", ios::out | ios::binary);
  outfile.write((char*)&data[0][0], sizeof(double)*200000*10000);
  outfile.close();

  return 0;
}

there is "segmentation fault (core dumped)" observed. But I don't understand why since sizeof(double)*200000*10000 < 2^63, so it should be ok for array of that size to be output.

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2  
The data structure you declared on the stack is too big for the stack. –  paddy Aug 19 '13 at 2:59
    
do you mean the array is too big. I am confusing is the size of the array should be fine if it is less than 2^63 for 64 bit system (and if memory is enough)? I don't know what's the stack does but if anyway to output that big array? Thanks. –  user1285419 Aug 19 '13 at 3:03
    
The stack is normally limited to a few megabytes or so. Even if you make it a global, 2^63 bytes requires (obviously enough) 2^63 bytes of backing store. That requires 2097152 drives (at 4 terabytes apiece) to act as virtual memory. I think it's fair to guess that you don't have 2 million+ 4 terabyte drives connected to your computer. –  Jerry Coffin Aug 19 '13 at 3:04
    
Thanks for your comment. So the only way to output such big array is to break it into pieces, right? –  user1285419 Aug 19 '13 at 3:10
    
I am surprised that the char example worked. That array is about 2 GB, declared on the stack. I expect that it didn't work, but you had undefined behaviour. In any case, please allocate giant chunks of data on the heap instead (using new). You can ask for it in one contiguous chunk, and if you're lucky you'll get it. On a 64GB system that isn't doing much else, you probably will. –  paddy Aug 19 '13 at 3:12
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your arrays are too big to fit on the stack, which has limited size no matter how much RAM you have. A quick-fix is to make them static. The better solution is to allocate them dynamically, either using new or vector. The fact your array is 2d makes it a bit tricky to pass a pointer to the file. Can you do this?

vector<double> data(2000000000);
fstream outfile("output.dat", ios::out | ios::binary);
outfile.write((char*)&data[0], data.size() * sizeof (double));

If this throws std::bad_alloc then your OS didn't have enough memory to provide.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you are right. I try your example and it seems work (it takes quite a long time to write the array to the file but it didn't return error so far). But I still don't understand if it is because of '2D' or not? Will be work if I use 1D array of 2000000000 instead of std::vector? –  user1285419 Aug 19 '13 at 3:27
    
@user1285419 Vector is only 1d. If you want 2d, then either you make one big vector and do an index calculation [x + y * xsize] (you can wrap this in a class), or you make vector<vector<T>> v(ysize, vector<T>(xsize) which lets you access as v[y][x] but the whole array is NOT contiguous in memory, so you cannot take a pointer to the beginning and output in a single file operation. –  Neil Kirk Aug 19 '13 at 3:29
    
@user1285419 Maybe I don't understand what you said. The cause of the problem isn't 1d/2d. A 1d array on the stack will give the same problem. double data[2000000000] will not work either. –  Neil Kirk Aug 19 '13 at 3:30
    
oh, I see, I don't know that memory assigned for vector is not continuous. Thanks for pointing that out and it works with vector. –  user1285419 Aug 19 '13 at 3:39
    
@user1285419 Within a vector, memory is contiguous. But if you use a vector of vector to create a 2d array, the whole memory is not contiguous. This is because each vector makes its own allocation. –  Neil Kirk Aug 19 '13 at 4:04
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