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I have implemented TSMessage via Cocoapods into one of my projects. I am trying to subclass a class method of TSMessage to set the default view controller. From TSMessage.m:

+ (UIViewController *)defaultViewController
{
    NSLog(@"No view controller was set as parameter and TSMessage was not subclassed. If you want to subclass, implement defaultViewController to set the default viewController.");
    return nil;
    // Implement this in subclass
}

In my class I am trying to subclass this method to return my main view controller. Here is my code at the top of one my main implementation file, ViewController.m:

@interface mySubclass : TSMessage
+(UIViewController *)defaultViewController;
@end

@implementation mySubclass
+(UIViewController *)defaultViewController{
    NSLog(@"test");
    ViewController *vc = [[ViewController alloc] init];
    return vc;
}//end method
@end

I still get logged the message from TSMessage saying that the method was not sub-classed. I have searched Google to no avail; I have a feeling that I am just missing something super obvious. I am new to this so please bear with me :)

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2  
What's almost certainly happening is that whomever is calling defaultViewController is not using your subclass. Somebody needs to say [mySubclass defaultViewController] for that method to be invoked. (also, by convention, class names should begin with a capital). –  danh Aug 19 '13 at 3:58

4 Answers 4

It looks like you are using an old version of TSMessage. When I look at the code on github the source code for that method has changed. Perhaps it was not working in the version you have.

I recommend upgrading to the latest version of the code, and then as soon as your apps is launched, call the +[TSMessage setDefaultViewController:] method from your app delegate object:

#import "TSMessage.h"

@implementation MyAppDelegate

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions
{
  [TSMessage setDefaultViewController:self.defaultViewController];
}

@end

Note: this assumes there is a "defaultViewController" property on self. I would create/assign this property using the MainWindow.xib file.

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I have noticed that. When I run 'Pod Update' then 'Pod install' it still installs this version (0.9.3 I think). But in the end I would still like to know the answer to my original question. Also, this is the line from my Podfile handling TSMessage. 'pod 'TSMessages','~>0.9'' –  Shredder2794 Aug 22 '13 at 23:19
    
There isn't really an answer to your original question. I think TSMessages has a bug where it sends a message to the wrong object. In objective-c a "class" is really just an instance of an object. Your class is one object, and the superclass of your class is another object. TSMessage is sending the defaultViewController message to the superclass object instead of the class object you defined yourself. –  Abhi Beckert Aug 23 '13 at 5:50
    
If you're using the latest stable version, it must be possible to upgrade to the non-stable release. Or perhaps you could compare your source code to the master source code in github, and copy/paste the changes over. –  Abhi Beckert Aug 23 '13 at 5:52
    
I have thought about just downloading and including in manually. I have just started using Cocoapods though, so I was hoping to use that to handle all my third party controls. Thanks for the response though. This was the first time for me to try to subclass a method like this and I just didn't know if I was doing something stupid wrong. –  Shredder2794 Aug 23 '13 at 6:04

I think you need to make sure [mySubclass sharedInstance] and not [TSMessage sharedInstance] is called first to initialize the static variable to the instance of your class (mySubclass) rather then an instance of TSMessage. This will ensure your defaultController method will get executed later on.

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I'm the developer of TSMessages and just found this question. Sorry about the problems with

+(UIViewController *)defaultViewController

This was a bug in an old version which was replaced by

+ setDefaultViewController(UIViewController *)defaultViewController

Thanks @abhi-beckert for pointing out the new API for setting the default view controller.

Next time, you can also create an issue on GitHub: https://github.com/toursprung/TSMessages/issues?state=open and link to the Stackoverflow question.

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TSMessage won't be calling +[mySubClass defaultViewController], it'll still be calling +[TSMessage defaultViewController]. Despite your subclassing TSMessage and rewriting the class method, it won't be calling your new class method since that's only bound to your subclass.

The simplest way to fix this is to create a category on TSMessage, put your rewritten class method in the implementation and include the header file in your .pch file, that way even if you do update to a new version of TSMessage in the future, it will still work in exactly the same way with no changes needed.

The following code will solve your issue.

@interface TSMessage (RewriteDefaultViewController)
@end

@implementation TSMessage (RewriteDefaultViewController)
+ (UIViewController *)defaultViewController
{
    NSLog(@"test");
    ViewController *vc = [[ViewController alloc] init];
    return vc;
}
@end
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