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I have a hashmap with 20000 entries. The hashmap is of the form,

Map<Integer,Map<String,Object>> mapOne

I have method to write the map to file.

public void createFiles(String fileName, Map map) throws IOException {
        FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(fileName);
        ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(fos);
        oos.writeObject(map);
        oos.close();
}

This method through's java heap space error on trying to write the mapOne to file. Is there any other better way to store the map into file for later use?

The JDK version: 1.7.0_17 The map within the mapOne contains unique elements,with frequencies of the objects in the map.

The error message obtained:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream$HandleTable.growEntries(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream$HandleTable.assign(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeOrdinaryObject(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeObject0(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.defaultWriteFields(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeSerialData(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeOrdinaryObject(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeObject0(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeObject(Unknown Source)
    at java.util.HashMap.writeObject(Unknown Source)
    at sun.reflect.GeneratedMethodAccessor3.invoke(Unknown Source)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(Unknown Source)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectStreamClass.invokeWriteObject(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeSerialData(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeOrdinaryObject(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeObject0(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeObject(Unknown Source)
    at java.util.HashMap.writeObject(Unknown Source)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(Unknown Source)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(Unknown Source)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectStreamClass.invokeWriteObject(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeSerialData(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeOrdinaryObject(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeObject0(Unknown Source)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeObject(Unknown Source)
    at TestIndex.AlignReads.createFiles(AlignReads.java:458)
    at TestIndex.AlignReads.loadInputFiles(AlignReads.java:241)
    at TestIndex.AlignReads.<init>(AlignReads.java:126)
    at TestIndex.AlignReads.main(AlignReads.java:493)
share|improve this question
    
Do you reference the same Object multiple times within the map (via different keys)? Or are all references unique? – Greg Kopff Aug 19 '13 at 4:31
2  
increase the heap space – Scary Wombat Aug 19 '13 at 4:32
1  
That should not happen. Is your class implementing the java.io.Serializable interface. Please provide the stack trace of your Error/Exception. – Aniket Thakur Aug 19 '13 at 4:36
1  
The question is "Is there any other better way to store the map into file for later use?". Please let's not transform it into "How do i correct this code?" – Mario Rossi Aug 19 '13 at 4:41
2  
In your Eclipse goto Run -> Run Configuration and open this particular Java Application. Then click on Arguments and add -Xmx2048M and run your application. See how it behaves then. – anubhava Aug 19 '13 at 5:00
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This doesn't seem to be a very large HashMap. You should consider increasing heap ("memory") size when invoking your program. In the case of Oracle's JDK version 1.7.0_17, this can be done with command line switches -Xms1g -Xmx1g . This example sets the maximum heap to 1 GB. For it to became fully effective, the machine has to have (virtual) memory resources enough, of course. The default value can be as little as 64 MB (less than 10% of 1 GB), depending on the exact conditions.

Regarding, your second question, you need to specify what you consider "better". That said, using the standard object serialization API as you are doing is the best option in most cases.

The second most common alternative (some could say it's really the first), is to store information in a database and construct objects from that information as required. Obviously, if for some reason you need all the information in memory at the same time, you have not advanced much.

The third alternative (valid in case for some reason object serialization API was misbehaving in this particular case (which I doubt)), is not to serialize the whole map, but each element at a time. Or even each data item. This requires you to define an application-specific serialization protocol on top of the standard API. Not extremely difficult, but probably meriting a separate question.

share|improve this answer
2  
But each entry is itself a map, so it could be large indeed. – Bohemian Aug 19 '13 at 4:35
    
I tested with two different object parameters,the object with more parameters causes the heap space error,where as the object with less parameters doesn't through any error. – Balaram26 Aug 19 '13 at 4:41
    
@Bohemian You are right there. I hadn't noticed. However, the serialization API doesn't use much more heap than the original object hierarchy. The OP is close to the limit anyways. – Mario Rossi Aug 19 '13 at 4:45
    
@Balaram26 What is your JVM? What heap sizes have you tried? – Mario Rossi Aug 19 '13 at 4:47
1  
0.1% of 1 GB is not even remotely close to 64 MB... Not sure what that statement is about...? Also, the JVM default is based on the systems installed memory. – Xabster Aug 19 '13 at 6:02

Maybe, you are serializing objects that reference large objects that you do not want to be serialized. Example taken from the java.awt.Component javadoc:

Developers will need, as always, to consider the implications of making an object serializable. One situation to watch out for is this:

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.io.Serializable;

class MyApp implements ActionListener, Serializable
{
    BigObjectThatShouldNotBeSerializedWithAButton bigOne;
    Button aButton = new Button();

    MyApp()
    {
        // Oops, now aButton has a listener with a reference
        // to bigOne!
        aButton.addActionListener(this);
    }

    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
    {
        System.out.println("Hello There");
    }
}

In this example, serializing aButton by itself will cause MyApp and everything it refers to to be serialized as well. The problem is that the listener is serializable by coincidence, not by design.

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