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I have a list of strings in scala template of play framework.
I want to iterate over half of list at one time and then the other half of list on the second time.
I am not sure how to write efficient iterator for this.

I have tried
@for(i <- 0 until list.length/2 ) {list(i) }
and then for second loop

@for(i <- list.length/2+1 until list.length ) 
 { list(i) } 


This works but complexity becomes high.

Then later I did

  @defining(list.size) { size => 
    @for(i <- 0 until size/2) 
    {list(i) }
  }


Now it seems to work fine.

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1  
What have you tried? Any code sample? –  Jeremy D Aug 19 '13 at 6:05
1  
Please, edit your question above, even if you had what seems to be a good answer. –  Jeremy D Aug 19 '13 at 6:25
    
I just tried @for(i <- 0 until list.length/2 ) {list(i) } and then for second loop @for(i <- list.length/2+1 until list.length ) { list(i) } . This seems to be working fine for now. –  user2694377 Aug 19 '13 at 6:26
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's one way.

scala> List("a","b","c","d","e")
res0: List[String] = List(a, b, c, d, e)

scala> res0.splitAt(res0.size/2)
res1: (List[String], List[String]) = (List(a, b),List(c, d, e))

scala> res1._1.foreach(println(_))
a
b

scala> res1._2.foreach(println(_))
c
d
e
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Yeah. This would work but I dont want the overhead of creating another list.I just found the syntax in for loop to iterate over only the half of list . @for(i <- 0 until list.length/2 ) {} and then from list.length/2+1 until list.length. –  user2694377 Aug 19 '13 at 6:32
1  
@user2694377: the cost of creating 2 new collections is O(N), iterating through List using index is O(N^2). It's really not a good idea. You could use an Iterator with drop and take if you don't want to copy collection. –  senia Aug 19 '13 at 8:43
    
Okay. Thanks. Sorry I dint notice that it was O(n^2). Thanks for pointing it out. –  user2694377 Aug 19 '13 at 8:50
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Use sliding to create iterators,

scala> val input = List(1, 2, 3)
input: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3)

scala> val step = (input.length + 1 ) / 2
step: Int = 2

scala> val sliding = input.sliding(step, step)
sliding: Iterator[List[Int]] = non-empty iterator

scala> val left = sliding.next()
left: List[Int] = List(1, 2)

scala> val right = sliding.next()
right: List[Int] = List(3)

scala> left.foreach(println)
1
2

scala> right.foreach(println)
3

or use take & drop,

scala> val input = List(1, 2, 3)
input: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3)

scala> val step = (input.length + 1 ) / 2
step: Int = 2

scala> input.take(step).foreach(println)
1
2

scala> input.drop(step).foreach(println)
3
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Iterator might be a good choice.

scala> val list = List(1,2,3,4,5,6)
list: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)

scala> val iterator = list.toIterator
iterator: Iterator[Int] = non-empty iterator

scala> val half = (0 until list.size / 2)
half: scala.collection.immutable.Range = Range(0, 1, 2)

scala> val left = (list.size / 2 until list.size)
left: scala.collection.immutable.Range = Range(3, 4, 5)

scala> half foreach { x => println(x + ":" + iterator.next) }
0:1
1:2
2:3

scala> left foreach { x => println(x + ":" + iterator.next) }
3:4
4:5
5:6
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