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Can we declare constructor of a class to be friend? I think it cannot be. But i read somewhere that it can be, but i was unable to do. If yes can you please provide some example code.

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Why don't you declare the whole class a friend instead? – wilx Aug 19 '13 at 9:20
    
post your code. – Karoly Horvath Aug 19 '13 at 9:23
1  
@KarolyHorvath: That's useful in general, but what would you show here? friend <what goes here> ; ? That doesn't add anything to this question. – MSalters Aug 19 '13 at 9:55
    
@MSalters: ??. sure it does. It should work, so there must be a specific syntactic problem in the OP's code, or maybe a misunderstanding regarding how friendliness works. either way, you could reflect to the actual problem, and not just say "it should work". – Karoly Horvath Aug 19 '13 at 10:01
    
@KarolyHorvath: Well, usually you'd write friend <name-of-function>; but constructors don't have names so I can see a reasonable source of confusion. – MSalters Aug 19 '13 at 10:26
up vote 25 down vote accepted

Yes it can:

class Y
{
public:
     Y();
};
class X
{
private:
     void foo() {}  
     friend Y::Y();
};
Y::Y() 
{
   X x; x.foo(); 
}  

As per 11.3 Friends [class.friend]

5) When a friend declaration refers to an overloaded name or operator, only the function specified by the parameter types becomes a friend. A member function of a class X can be a friend of a class Y.

[ Example:

class Y {
friend char* X::foo(int);
friend X::X(char); // constructors can be friends
friend X::~X(); // destructors can be friends
};

—end example ]

(emphasis mine)

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2  
+1 for digging out the example from the standard :) – SteveLove Aug 19 '13 at 9:30
    
is this valid class Y { public: friend Y(int); } If yes how would you define Y(int); – Shreyas Aug 19 '13 at 9:31
3  
@Shreyas that wouldn't make sense, why would a class (or member) be a friend of itself? – Luchian Grigore Aug 19 '13 at 9:34
    
class Y { friend class Y; }; is valid but redundant. Same goes for class Y { Y(int); friend Y::Y(int); }; – jrok Aug 19 '13 at 10:05
    
@LuchianGrigore yes you are right. I got it now. Thank you. – Shreyas Aug 19 '13 at 10:25

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