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Both clang and gcc reject this code:

template<int i>
struct ambiguous
{
    static const int value = i;
};

namespace N
{
    template<int i>
    void ambiguous();

    int i = ambiguous<3>::value; // finds the function template name
}

However, they both accept the following code:

struct ambiguous
{
    static const int value = 0;
};

namespace N
{
    void ambiguous();

    int i = ambiguous::value;
}

The standard says that name lookup of a name preceding :: "considers only namespaces, types, and templates whose specializations are types". Are clang and gcc correct in rejecting this code? If so, what am I missing?

From C++ Working Draft Standard n3337

3.4.3 Qualified name lookup [basic.lookup.qual]

The name of a class or namespace member or enumerator can be referred to after the :: scope resolution operator (5.1) applied to a nested-name-specifier that denotes its class, namespace, or enumeration. If a :: scope resolution operator in a nested-name-specifier is not preceded by a decltype-specifier, lookup of the name preceding that :: considers only namespaces, types, and templates whose specializations are types. If the name found does not designate a namespace or a class, enumeration, or dependent type, the program is ill-formed.

14.2 Names of template specializations [temp.names]

For a template-name to be explicitly qualified by the template arguments, the name must be known to refer to a template.

After name lookup (3.4) finds that a name is a template-name or that an operator-function-id or a literal-operator-id refers to a set of overloaded functions any member of which is a function template if this is followed by a <, the < is always taken as the delimiter of a template-argument-list and never as the less-than operator.

Edit

To avoid confusion of this issue with the ambiguity between an expression and a declaration, here is the original code with the templates using a type parameter instead of a non-type parameter.

template<class>
struct ambiguous
{
    static const int value = 0;
};

namespace N
{
    template<class>
    void ambiguous();

    int i = ambiguous<int>::value; // finds the function template name
}

This results in the same error in all cases. The < cannot be interpreted as an operator.

ambiguous is unambiguously a template-name, but could either be a type or a function. It's possible to parse the entire template-id without knowing whether it names a function or a type, and resolve the ambiguity later on. Does the standard excuse the implementor from doing this?

share|improve this question
    
msvc and ICC also reject it with the same error. –  willj Aug 19 '13 at 10:27
    
OK, so what is the error message? –  arne Aug 19 '13 at 10:29
    
clang: error: qualified name refers into a specialization of function template 'ambiguous', gcc: cannot resolve overloaded function ‘ambiguous’ based on conversion to type ‘int’, msvc 'ambiguous' : use of class template requires template argument list –  willj Aug 19 '13 at 10:31
    
This particular ambiguity is one of the things that makes C++ very difficult to parse. We don't know until :: whether or not we should ignore the non-type name - so the ambiguity remains unresolved until we parse the entire template-id :D. –  willj Aug 19 '13 at 10:37
    
@willj Yes. And we can't parse a template-id until we know that ambiguous names a template, which means that the name has to be bound first. (The < could be a less than.) –  James Kanze Aug 19 '13 at 12:48

2 Answers 2

The problem is that the paragraph you quote ends up being applied too late. Before getting there, the compiler must determine that in ambiguous<3>::value, the < and > are template argument delimiters, and not greater than and less than. (Consider:

int ambiguous;
int value:
//  ...
int i = ambiguous<3>::value;

, which parses as (ambiguous < 3) > ::value, where the < and > are less than and greater than, respectively.) This involves a lookup of ambiguous as an unqualified name, and binds the symbol to N::ambiguous. Afterwards, you're stuck with the instantiated template N::ambiguous<3> to the left of ::, which isn't legal.

EDIT:

This issue isn't as clear as one might like: the standard only refers to section 3.4 in section 14.2, where it discusses this, and section 3.4 discusses all of the possible rules of name lookup. On the other hand, there is really only one way to interpret it: the compiler cannot parse anything further until it knows whether ambiguous names a template or not, and can decide whether the following < is greater than, or opens a template argument list. And of course, it cannot "rebind" the argument later, once it has parsed the following tokens, since in the general case, rebinding could change the meaning of the <, invalidating the parse. In practice, although the standard doesn't say so as clearly as it probably should, the name lookup in this case must be unqualified name lookup (or class member access, if the name is preceded by a . or a -> operator).

share|improve this answer
1  
In my example, ambiguous is unambiguously a template-name, but could either be a type or a function. It's possible to parse the entire template-id without knowing whether it names a function or a type, and resolve the ambiguity later on. Does the standard excuse the implementor from doing this? –  willj Aug 19 '13 at 10:43
    
@willj The standard is very string concerning name lookup, and doesn't allow the implementor any liberty in this regard. (Or if it does, and there is no undefined behavior, then it is a serious defect in the standard.) –  James Kanze Aug 19 '13 at 10:51
    
@willj And in your example, when unqualified name lookup is used, N::ambiguous hides ::ambiguous. (A more interesting case would be if you defined both in the same scope. In this case, in general, struct ambiguous would refer to the struct, and other uses to the function, but the text you cited could also be interpreted that in ambiguous<3>::, the compiler should find the struct, and not the function. –  James Kanze Aug 19 '13 at 10:54
    
It's possible to parse your example unambiguously if we defer the binding of ambiguous to N::ambiguous until reaching ::, at which point the ambiguity can be resolved. There is no type named ambiguous, so the :: cannot be part of a nested-name-specifier ::, therefore ambiguous<3>::value can only be interpreted as an expression. –  willj Aug 19 '13 at 11:13
    
It's possible to parse any of the example if we allow backtracking and speculative parsing. The case above is one of the worst, since when backtracking, we have to actually change some of the tokens. –  James Kanze Aug 19 '13 at 12:46

Seem templates in the inner namespace hide the names of the outer.

template<int i>
struct A
{
    static const int value = 0;
};

struct B
{
    static const int value = 0;
};

typedef A<0> C;


namespace N
{
    // The local function A is not declaced, yet, but the global A is:
    int early_e = A<3>::value; // Ok: The A in the global namespace. [simple-template-id}

    template<int i>
    int A() { return 0; }
    int B() { return 0; }
    int C() { return 0; }

    int a = A<3>();        // Ok: The A in the namespace. [simple-template-id}
    int b = N::A<3>();     // Ok: The A in the namespace. [N::simple-template-id]
    int c = ::N::A<3>();   // Ok: The A in the namespace. [::N::simple-template-id]
    int d = ::A<3>::value; // Ok: The A in the global namespace. ::simple-template-id::identifier]
    // The local function A is no type: "templates whose specializations are types"
    int e = A<3>::value;   // Error: The namespace has the function name A,
                           // which hides the global A. [simple-template-id::identifier]
    // The local function B is no type, but the global B is a type:
    int f = B::value;      // Ok: The B in the global namespace. [class-name::identifier]
    // The local function C is no type, but the global typedef C is a type:
    int g = C::value;      // Ok: The C in the global namespace. [typedef-name::identifier]
}

int main() {
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes. That's exactly what he was asking about. –  James Kanze Aug 19 '13 at 12:48
    
That's a comprehensive analysis of the behaviour.. but of which compiler? This highlights the inconsistency: typedef A<0> C followed by C::value is allowed, but A<3>::value is rejected. –  willj Aug 20 '13 at 18:58
    
@willj In the global namespace C is a typedef, A a template only. Hence, hiding A in the local namespece, makes it a function, not a type. In case of C the type in the outer namespace is considerd. –  Dieter Lücking Aug 21 '13 at 18:09

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