Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a command to run on Terminal OSX:

cat File1 | ./huawei2text.pl > ~/File2.txt && cat ~/File2.txt| tr "," "\n"  > ~/Output.txt

How can I run this command using only java?

I tried this code:

String whatToRun = "cat File1 | ./File.pl > ~/File2.txt && cat ~/File2.txt| tr "," "\n"  > ~/Output.txt";
   try
   {
     Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime();
     Process proc = rt.exec(whatToRun);
     int exitVal = proc.waitFor();
     System.out.println("Process exitValue:" + exitVal);
   } catch (Throwable t)
     {
       t.printStackTrace();
     }

Updated

Answer and solution:

String whatToRun = "cat File1 | ./File.pl > File2.txt "
            + "&& cat File2.txt| tr \",\" \"\n\"  > Output.txt";
String[] shellcmd = {"/bin/sh", "-c", whatToRun};

try {
    Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime();
    Process proc = rt.exec(shellcmd);
    int exitVal = proc.waitFor();
    System.out.println("Process exitValue:" + exitVal);
    }
catch (Throwable t) {
    t.printStackTrace();
}

Now It works. Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
What does "it is not working" mean? Do you get any errors? –  Goibniu Aug 19 '13 at 10:58
    
Program is working, but there is not any actions. Only output: "Process exitValue:1" –  Ryainad Aug 19 '13 at 11:06
    
The exit value indicates that what you pass to exec is not working; it is likely a command not found error. –  chepner Aug 19 '13 at 13:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Pipes would be interpreted by the shell. Ask your shell to execute the command instead:

String[] shellcmd = {
  "/bin/sh",
  "-c",
  whatToRun
};

Process proc = rt.exec(shellcmd);
share|improve this answer

The Java API allows you to start one subprocess, by naming an executable to run. What you have there is a whole mini-script banged together into a one-liner. Only a shell can interpret such things, so your string should start with something like

/bin/sh -c '... your command ...'

Note the single quotes, they are important.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.