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Could anybody please tell me how to extract the first 30 characters of the contents from XML file?

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what language? 15 characters –  Florian Peschka Dec 2 '09 at 7:50
You mean, the non-tag part? –  K Prime Dec 2 '09 at 7:50
do you need the solution in pseudocode? –  Jonathan Dec 2 '09 at 7:51

4 Answers 4

Open the file in notepad, and select the first 30 characters. Hit Ctrl-C.

If you want to do this programmatically, you'll need to tell us what language you're using.

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I wanted to write that myself, but hadn't had the guts :-( –  Florian Peschka Dec 2 '09 at 7:55
I'm tired and I don't give a sh*t. Ask a silly question - get a silly answer :) –  Charlie Salts Dec 2 '09 at 7:56
Reviewing my comment, hadn't had - is that even correct oO? Too early to speak english yawn... –  Florian Peschka Dec 2 '09 at 7:59
@ ApoY2k - It's a little awkward. did not have is better. –  Charlie Salts Dec 2 '09 at 8:02

On linux/unix/cygwin:

head -c 30 myfile.xml

If you want the first 30 text characters outside of the tags then:

1) install xmltwig - this is a perl module, so you will need to install perl if you do not have it. Xmltwig includes the xml_grep utility.

2) run:

xml_grep --text_only myfile.xml | head -c 30
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In C#, after reading the XML into an XmlDocument:

string s = doc.DocumentElement.InnerText.Substring(0, 30);

This returns the first 30 characters of the text nodes in the document, e.g.:

<foo>This is <bar>some sort of <baz>crazy</baz> markup.</bar></foo>

will return:

This is some sort of crazy mar
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Open the file Ask the file stream reader to read in first 30 bytes Close the file

If you want the non-tag 30 characters, read the first 200 bytes, then run a regular expression to remove the tags.

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reading the first 200 bytes doesn't work. It might very well contain only tags, leaving you with less than 30 characters ;^) –  Toad Dec 2 '09 at 7:54
yeah yeah yeah. Ideally, get the first X chars, run the regex, if not enough, get more bytes. –  Alex Weinstein Dec 2 '09 at 8:00

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