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I have an 'Account' service which acts as a centralized data storage used in multiple controllers and views. This service will hold, besides getter and setter methods all data associated with two types of users, being a logged in user and an anomonous user.

The idea behind this service is that it should be used as a centralized data structure which will keep all associated views and controllers in synch. Eg: If a user logs in whe will know his email and all 'newsletter subscription' fields can be prefilled.

The current setup i use is as below. Note that each Async call on the server will return a promise.

// The Service
angular.module('A').provider('AccountService', [function() {

    this.$get = function ($resource) {

        var Account = {
            getLoggedInAccountAsync : function () {
              var Account = $resource(WebApi.Config.apiUrl + 'Account/Get');
              return Account.get();
            },

            getUserData : function () {
                return Account.userData; 
            },

            setUserData : function (accountData) {
                var merge = angular.extend((Account.currentAccountData || {}), accountData);
                Account.currentAccountData = merge; 
            }    
        };

        return Account;
    }
});

// Our main app controller. Get's fired on every page load.
angular.module('A').controller('MainController', ['AccountService', function (AccountService) {

    var loggedInAccount = AccountService.getLoggedInAccountAsync();
    loggedInAccount.$then(loggedInAccountPromiseResolved);

    function loggedInAccountPromiseResolved (response) {
       if (response.data.isLoggedIn) {
           AccountService.setAccountData(response.data);
       }
    };

    return $scope.MainController= this;
}])

// Our specific controller. For example a newsletter subscription.
angular.module('A').controller('SpecificController', ['AccountService', function (AccountService) {
    this.getUserData = AccountService.getUserData;
    return $scope.Controller = this;
}])

// Newsletter subscription view
<input id="email" type="email" name="email" ng-model="SpecificController.getUserData().UserName"/>

Using the above code ensures that whenever we use the service to bind our data via Controller.getUserData().property to our view it will stay in synch throughout our entire app.

The code above will also throw if for example the .UserName value is not defined, or if there is no account data at all in case of an anomonous user. One way around this is to 'dump' our 'template' object within our service with null values this will ensure the key/values exist. Another way would be to use watchers and let our controller(s) 'write' to our service in case an user fills a field.

The first option gives me more flexability as i can centralize all the data binding in the service but it feels dirty because you never know what will happen with the server data, it could come in as a different format for example.

Does anyone have any other solution? I would prefer to not let my controllers do the writing of the data to the service.

Thank you for your time!

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2 Answers

There are many questions here, I will answer as best as I can.

No, what you are doing is not a "best practice".

First, The model should be injected directly into the view, and maintaining the value is the responsibility of the Controller, with the help of "$scope". Your "ng-model="Controller.getUserData().UserName" is bad. There is a good example of what to do in the end of the blog article I noticed below.

Second, when you fetch data from a service, most of the time, the answer will be asynchronous, so you'd better take a look at the Promise API. The official doc of AngularJS is not always fantastic and sometimes the answer can be found on google groups or in blog article.

For your problem, here is a good article : http://markdalgleish.com/2013/06/using-promises-in-angularjs-views/

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thx for the link! –  chris ツ Dec 3 '13 at 9:33
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  1. Firstly, if you use service in AngularJS, we expect a call to server or whatever that may not return data instantly. So we have two approaches of using ugly callback or beautiful $q.

I prefer using promise since it's cleaner to write. I will rewrite your snippets in a better way :

// Service
angular.module('A').provider('AccountService', [function() {

    this.$get = function ($resource, $q) {

        var Account = {
            getUserData : function () {
                var d = $q.defer();
                d.resolve(Account.userData);
                return d.promise; 
            }    
        };

        return Account;
    }
});

// Controller
angular.module('A').controller('Controller', ['AccountService', function (AccountService) {
    var init = function() {
      getUserData();
    };

    var getUserData = function() {
       AccountService.getUserData().then(function(data) { $scope.username = data; }); 
    };

    init();
    //return $scope.Controller = this; // you don't need to do this 
}])

HTML:

<input id="email" type="email" name="email" ng-model="username"/>
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